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Coconut Oil plus aricept
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

quote:
Do you see a problem with the Lauric Acid in coconut oil, or just the LCT's ? Is Lauric acid digested like the other MCT's ?

Edward, sorry it took so long to answer you -- I very rarely read this forum. I just noticed Tom had made a contribution, and he often has helpful info, so I took a look.

It is becoming more and more common to place lauric among the LCTs rather than the MCTs, as more and more is known about its metabolism and biological impact. A small percentage of it may be transformed into ketone bodies, depending on the rest of your diet, but there's a huge amount of evidence that the majority is metabolized the way the other LCTs are, i.e.,processed via the lymph system and stored as fat. (The Polynesians everyone talks about who eat so much coconut have very high levels of lauric acids in their adipose tissue -- even though they eat what would be considered a ketogenic diet.) And lauric is specifically included among the "unhealthy" saturated fats that pose health risks by the FDA and AMA (among others).
http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/e...=996103841#996103841

I know sugar is a problem for cognitive function, but haven't really looked at whether it impacts MCT metabolism per se.
Internal Administrator
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: EdwardL

My wife was diagnosed with frontal lobe, semantic dementia last year. She is in her mid 60's. Throughout her life, she would sometimes get migraine-like headaches in the front of her head that could last for a couple days. She also is lactose intolerant. About 10 years ago, by trial and error, gluten was found to be the cause of the headaches. And more recently, the same is found to be true for dairy (casein).

Gluten and casein have similar peptide molecules and unfortunately, to the immune sytem, look similar to certain brain cells. The headaches were apparently the immune system attacking and damaging the brain cells. Unfortunely, we did not realize that gluten intolerance can cause various types of neurological damage, and we really didn't totally eliminate wheat and dairy until just recently.

We happened to be using a little bit of extra virgin coconut oil as part of our diet. But increasing the amount more continually during the day and evening (about 3 tsps total)improved her condition significantly, but only after going gluten free. One possibility is that ketones from coconut can be used to feed the brain just like glucose. Maybe the brain becomes insulin resistent and does not use glucose properly. Adding aricept to the evening meal also seems to have helped nighttime bad dreams. The combination is working well and so far she is a happy, functional person. It has not reversed the brain damage however.

But if she accidently eats gluten or dairy when we eat out at a restaurant or pot luck dinner, all bets are off and she reverts to being paranoid and sleep becomes a nightmare. She basically becomes nonfunctional. Bottom line, there is no viable tratment when she eats the wrong foods.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

I should also note that I found sooooooooo much misinformation about coconut oil on the web, it was amazing. DO NOT believe anything you find at a health food store website, coconut oil website, etc. They either do not provide any references for their claims or, if references are cited, you'll find that the original papers do NOT say what the coconut nuts claim. I tracked 'em all down -- the original papers, and subsequent studies that cited them.

Always, always, always read the original research papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Never, never, never believe "news" articles or junk papers that do not cite their sources.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: Ttom

quote:
Originally posted by Doug146:
Dr Mary Newport


Hey Doug and welcome! Please take any thing that Dr Mary Newport has to say with a grain of salt.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

quote:
Search on the internet for using Coconut Oil for health reasons and you should find some info on it. ...But for us right now it tastes good and why not?

I was warned by our neuro (an expert in dementias) that coconut oil is very unhealthy for you ... so I spent weeks looking into it.

Gram for gram, coconut oil contains far more of four saturated fats (lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic) than any other foodstuff.

The FDA and the AMA warn that these saturated fats pose numerous health risks. The long-term consumption of high levels of these four saturated fats are strong risk factors for cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity -- all of which have strong links to Alzheimer's and share many of the same underlying pathologies with AD -- and have also been directly linked to cognitive decline. Many of the studies on which these conclusions were based were done in humans with coconut oil ... since coconut oil is the richest source of these four saturated fats.

Note that the Mediterranean diet, which is linked to delayed onset and progression of MCI and AD, emphasizes low consumption of saturated fats.

Watch that supplementary film, "The Connection Between Insulin and Alzheimer's", from the HBO "The Alzheimer's Project", for a nice, simple discussion on the the relationship between insulin, the saturated fats found in such high amounts in coconut oil, and Alzheimer's:
http://www.hbo.com/alzheimers/...ementary-series.html

And see my posts at:
http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/e...=887106222#887106222
and
http://alzheimers.infopop.cc/e...=722109261#722109261
for additional references.

I have a .pdf of a 2009 review, "Saturated Fatty Acid-Mediated Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Adipose Tissue: Mechanisms of Action and Implications":
http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/139/1/1
which I can send it to anyone who is interested.

The reason people have been claiming that coconut oil can be beneficial to Alzheimer's patients is because it also comprises ~10-15% caprylic and capric triglycerides. Caprylic triglyceride is the "active ingredient" in Axona, a new, prescription-only medical food which has been shown to be beneficial to Alzheimer's patients in a series of small clinical trials. The scientific hypotheses underlying Axona / caprylic triglyceride are sound. Capric triglyceride is similar, and might be expected to have some of the same activity.

If you want to try an OTC treatment for Alzheimer's, use MCT oil. It has much, much more of the caprylic triglyceride than coconut oil does, and doesn't contain any of the unhealthy fats. It's essentially tasteless, so you can mix it with whatever you like. And I'd note that the "doctor" who has been pushing coconut oil (and is purportedly about to release a book ... there go her claims she's not benefiting from her coconut campaign) has been giving her husband very high levels of MCT oil as well as coconut oil.

I prefer Axona. It's formulated so the caprylic triglyceride is more bioavailable, and less likely to cause gastrointestinal upsets.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: LuciaKen

How do you use the oil, cooking or does it come in pill form to be taken as a supplement?
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: EdwardL

JAB,
Do you see a problem with the Lauric Acid in coconut oil, or just the LCT's ? Is Lauric acid digested like the other MCT's ?

It makes sense to also use MCT oils if ketones are the primary objective. It is the same logic as not trying to get all your protein from high fat nuts. Still plan to use some coconut oil (about 3 tsps), but have started to add significantly more MCT oils. Still a very small amount in comparison to Dr. Newport. I like to use as little as possible as long as it is effective.

Does sugar intake affect the amount of MCT conversion to ketones?

Thanks for your help. It has been very informative and has changed what we use.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: Doug146

I started wife on coconut oil after her doctor gave me a paper from Dr Mary Newport in Fl. Dr Newport's husband has Alz and she has noticed marked improvement when she put him on it. I am near the end of my 3rd 52oz tub and it does seem to help.I buy it on Amazon. Use it like butter and keep it at room temp. Also I have eliminated all other forms of fat in her diet.
I don't know how to sign this but I am Doug146 on chat
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: Barbara Thomas

I was so happy to see your post about Coconut Oil!! A friend referred me to this a couple months ago and we thought "why not". A little Coconut Oil couldn't hurt. My DH is already on Aricept and has had great results from that. He is also Diabetic and has had difficulty keeping his A1c down, even below 7. It has been 7.8 for sometime now. We did 2 things at the same time: 1. Started the Gluco Diet and 2. introduced Coconut Oil into our diet. 5 weeks into it he had his A1c checked it was down to 6.6. We are hoping that the CO is what is helping because on the Gluco Diet we starve sometimes and it is a lot of work, (I'm lazy you see). I am very interested in how this is working for your wife. My DH is 65 and I am 61. At the same time his A1c went down his Triglicerides went up to 250. Not that high but should be much lower. I feel that if the CO is what did that, the trade off is not that bad. I'd much rather see his glucose levels even out at this point. I will keep updating on his progress as time goes on. I know we are looking for miracles, but right now any little thing helps. Thanks for sharing. I would be interesting in knowing how you use the Coconut Oil in your diet.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: Rose_Ro

My mom is doing well on MCT oil, coconut oil, huperzine A, blood pressure meds, other supplements, Namenda and a higher dose of thyroid med (natural, dessicated. I think synthroid hurt her)
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: Nan63

JAB,

I have a father who has Alzheimer's and a 16 yr old daughter who is Type 1 Diabetic since she was 5, will the coconut oil work for my daughters Diabetes for her A1c count? or blood sugars?

Thanks!
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: Tom(ek)

If you would like to read something about brain's energy in AD:

Bioenergetics breakdown in Alzheimer's disease: targets for new therapies

Energy defects as driver of Alzheimer's initiation and progression

Brain's energy needs are enormous as indicated by the fact that the brain weighs only 2% of total body weight but yet consumes 20% of total energy produced. The high-energy needs of neurons are required for neurotransmisson, synthesis of neuro-transmitters, myelination and other housekeeping functions. It is mainly dependent on glucose utilization for energy generation and is able to use very little of other sources such as fatty acids etc. Ketone bodies can also be used but less efficiently than glucose. The high energy needs can produce a conundrum for the brain especially in Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, defects in energy production by neurons are observed very early in this disease process. Energy deficits in neuron are defined as reduction in production of ATP, the major form of energy in cells.

More: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3134007/
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: EdwardL

The Axona and MCT oils look interesting and will check these out. Maybe a combination of these and coconut oil is better. I suspect the ketones feeding the brain is what is of benefit. She may have insulin resistence in part or all of her brain, some of which may have been caused by gluten damage. Diabetes can be in only part of the body. It is a stuggle to keep her from eating too much fructose, which is also damaging.

Refined coconut oil found in grocery stores is not healthy and some of the initial studies were done with refined oils. Extra Virgin oil is closest to the original oil, which is what we use. We put it on toast, in soups, and cook with it, or straight from a spoon. It seems to be better if consumed with the meal.

You can find studies either way as to the benefits. http://modernstylishlife.com/h...onut-oil-part-ii-05/ indicates a benefit. A quote from that article:

"The Bottom Line

There’s very little known about the effect of unrefined coconut oil on animal and human health, however what is published appears to be positive, and is broadly consistent with the health of traditional cultures eating unrefined coconut foods. The data on refined coconut oil are conflicting and frustrating to sort through. The effects of refined coconut oil seem to depend highly on dietary context and genetic background. In my opinion, virgin coconut oil can be part of a healthy diet, and may even have health benefits in some contexts."

I think the conversion to monolaurin is also of great benefit. Bottom line, it helps solve an immediate problem and we will continue to make it part of our diet.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: Barbara Thomas

There's no pill that I know of. Search on the internet for using Coconut Oil for health reasons and you should find some info on it. Sorry I don't have a link to it. But the first I got is in a glass pint jar and I got it at Whole Foods for around $8. I've been using it in cooking, spread it on bread for toast. I had to try fried chicken too. But anytime I need to use oil, I use it. I'm still learning and there are some great recipes. Don't know what it's going to do if anything. But for us right now it tastes good and why not?
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: Rose_Ro

The coconut oil we use is a small amount. I love the MCT oil. Dr Oz just touted coconut oil again for several reasons.

I will never understand why Axona uses sucralose. Bad stuff.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

That's an interesting paper, Tom, and brand-new -- I hadn't seen it. Thanks.

For more information on ketone body therapy, Edward, see:

Accera/Axona publications:

Henderson ST, Vogel JL, Barr LJ, Garvin F, Jones JJ, Costantini LC. Study of the ketogenic agent AC-1202 in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2009 Aug 10;6:31.
http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/6/1/31

Henderson ST. 2008. Ketone bodies as a therapeutic for Alzheimer’s Disease. Neurotherapeutics 5:470-480.
http://www2.prnewswire.com/mnr...eurotherapeutics.pdf

Costantini LC, Barr LJ, Vogel JL, Henderson ST. 2008. Hypometabolism as a therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease. BMC Neuroscience 9(Suppl 2):S16.
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/9/S2/S16

Studzinski CM, MacKay WA, Beckett TL, Henderson ST, Murphy MP, Sullivan PG, Burnham WM. 2008. Induction of ketosis may improve mitochondrial function and decrease steady-state amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) levels in the aged dog. Brain Res 1226:209-17.
I have a copy of the full paper, and would be happy to send it to anyone who'd like it.

Van der Auwera I, Wera S, Van Leuven F, Henderson ST.  2005.  A ketogenic diet reduces amyloid beta 40 and 42 in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Nutr Metab (London) 2:28.
http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/2/1/28

Henderson ST.  2004.  High carbohydrate diets and Alzheimer’s disease.  Med Hypotheses 62:689-700. 
I have a copy of the full paper, and would be happy to send it to anyone who'd like it. This one is an amazing tour de force.

Reger MA, Henderson ST, Hale C, Cholerton B, Baker LD, Watson GS, Hyde K, Chapman D, Craft S.  2004.  Effects of b-Hydroxybutyrate on cognition in memory-impaired adults. Neurobiol Aging 25:311-314.
http://www.numedica.com/literature/Reger%202004.pdf


Related publications:

Swerdlow RH, Burns JM, Khan SM.  The Alzheimer's disease mitochondrial cascade hypothesis.  J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;20 Suppl 2:S265-79. 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2883665

Maalouf M, Rho JM, Mattson MP.  The neuroprotective properties of calorie restriction, the ketogenic diet, and ketone bodies.  Brain Res Rev. 2009 Mar;59(2):293-315.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2649682

Swerdlow RH. Mitochondrial Medicine and the Neurodegenerative Mitochondriopathies. Pharmaceuticals 2009, 2(3), 150-167.
http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8247/2/3/150/pdf

Prins ML.  Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury.  J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2008 Jan;28(1):1-16. 
http://multivu.prnewswire.com/...2008KetoneReview.pdf

Barañano KW, Hartman AL.  The ketogenic diet: uses in epilepsy and other neurologic illnesses.  Curr Treat Options Neurol. 2008 Nov;10(6):410-9.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2898565/

Gasior M, Rogawski MA, Hartman AL.  Neuroprotective and disease-modifying effects of the ketogenic diet.  Behav Pharmacol. 2006 September; 17(5-6): 431–439.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2367001/

Kashiwaya Y, Takeshima T, Mori N, Nakashima K, Clarke K, Veech RL.  2000.  D-beta-hydroxybutyrate protects neurons in models of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 97:5440 –5444.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: JAB

That's the kind of unreliable garbage I was warning you about. Any article that says there's only been one study in animals with unrefined coconut oil, and that most studies in humans used refined oil, is completely bogus.

I could only find one study in rats that DID use refined coconut oil.

And I found dozens upon dozens upon dozens of studies in humans, every last one of which used virgin oil, and I'd hardly call the results from any of them "positive".

Any article that (a) doesn't list an author, so you know what their qualifications are, and (b) doesn't have a lengthy list of references should be ignored. And when an article does give references, read the original research papers. I found numerous examples of the coconut quacks claiming a study produced a result when the original paper had actually come to the opposite conclusion.
Anonymous
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2012 7:34 AM
Originally posted by: Rose_Ro

Why are we suppose to disregard Dr Newport's work?


I avoid thiamine mononitrate because of her post about this (I think the original source was Dr Oz?) or someone else?)
 
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