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Finding Qualified Caregiver Suggestions
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:42 PM
Originally posted by: Cathy J. M.

I've used a similar site, but we found our best caregivers from recommendations from our church -- word of mouth referrals. One was from the priest, one from another church member.

We'd get a few likely prospects and schedule two or three interviews per morning. My partner -- then about stage 4 or 4.5, interviewed them with me. I had questions to ask, but what divided the best prospects from the others was simply their rapport with my partner and shared interests.

One was really too hefty to handle an emergency, could hardly make it up the stairs. Another was too needy -- desperate for a job, any job, but not really interested in my partner. The worst was a "professional" caregiver who gossiped about her current client and talked condescendingly about Alzheimer's, while totally ignoring my partner. (Yuk! We had to take a walk outside to get rid of the horrible feeling, especially since we knew someone else was with her all day long.)

The best ones really saw my partner as an interesting person, and were attentive, kind and empathic. It's possible to learn caregiving skills, but hard to change personality and character.
Internal Administrator
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:42 PM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: LauraCo

Does anyone have some suggestions to find qualified caregivers? The best I have found so far is ifindcare.com because it is free to send messages and much better than craigslist.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:42 PM
Originally posted by: kjbell12

quote:
http://www.medicare.gov/HomeHealthCompare/search.aspx

Does medicare cover some of the expense for providing care to a person with Alzheimer's. My mother really needs assistance, but it is going to take all of her $$, I know she will be reluctant, yet, she cannot continue to live with all of the stress this is causing.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:42 PM
Originally posted by: Cathy J. M.

quote:
Originally posted by kjbell12:
quote:
http://www.medicare.gov/HomeHealthCompare/search.aspx

Does medicare cover some of the expense for providing care to a person with Alzheimer's. My mother really needs assistance, but it is going to take all of her $$, I know she will be reluctant, yet, she cannot continue to live with all of the stress this is causing.


For Medicare to cover home health, a doctor has to order it. In some cases, the nurse and therapists (speech/cognitive, occupational and physical) just come once or twice to evaluate the situation and train the primary caregiver about how to help the person with AD. In other cases, a nurse or therapist might come on a regular basis for several weeks in a row; then the doctor has to renew the order.

I met someone in a support group, for example, whose doctor renewed twice-weekly occupational therapy for her father (with Alzheimer's) as long as she reported to the doctor that her father was often dizzy.

My partner and I had consultations from each of the therapists and they were quite valuable. For example, the physical therapist watched my partner go through her daily activities, told me how to set the treadmill speed, told me which home improvements would really count for improving safety, etc. Just that one visit was extremely helpful.

Is it your dad who has AD, and your mom who needs help caring for him? If your parents' assets and income are low enough, your state may offer some in-home aides or a day center program. Some states also participate in a respite care program that's income-scaled, and some day centers are income-scaled.

It's very important that your mother work with an expert eldercare lawyer who's familiar with estate planning, eldercare financing and the state's specific Medicaid rules.

So here are three things to do:

1) Call the state's agency for aging to find out about resources for in-home or day center care.

2) Ask the doctor to order at least a home health evaluation for fall risk and to make sure the home is safe (and whatever else is possible via Medicare). Usually the nurse comes first and recommends the specialists who will come next.

3) Make sure all the legal and financial things are taken care of -- power of attorney documents, advance directives and a plan for making sure of both parents' care in the long run.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:42 PM
Originally posted by: loveofmylife

MC (Medicaire) will cover if there is a phyical need for a discipline to be in the home. For example, if the patient has an indwelling foley catheter they can have a HHA (Home Health Aide) up to 5 times a week for two hours per day pertaining to the need. A foley needs to be changed by an RN once a month. My husband has a catheter and gets an aide 3x/week. There are other ways for a discipline (PT, OT, or SN) physical therapy, occupational, skilled nurse to be in a home which would allow an aide. Hope this helps.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:42 PM
Originally posted by: JAB

I gather you want to find private individuals, not agencies? There's a good search engine for agencies at:
http://www.caring.com/local/in-home-care

And Medicare has a search tool, too:
http://www.medicare.gov/HomeHealthCompare/search.aspx
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:42 PM
Originally posted by: Babs W.

I have been Blessed to find my husband's caregiver during the day so I can work. I feel she cares about him as much as I do. My DH went on hospice but they only provide caregivers if he is in a crisis.
What I wanted to tell you is that most hospice agencies have a private agency side also. If you can find a good hospice agency in your area and if they have have a private agency side connected to them. You could then meet with the manager and interview caregivers. What is good about being with an agency you will always have coverage to take care of your love one and provide you also with respite when you need it.
I wish you the best in your search and pray you find the right person for you and your loved one.
GOD BLESS YOU BOTH
Babs
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:42 PM
Originally posted by: mcr

we talked with the social worker from our church who specializes in a lot of senior care. I was going to call agencies myself, but my mother wanted to start with the church. She felt good to be a part of things and we had a great meeting and she agreed...but then once we found a wonderful caregiver, my mom decided she wasn't needed and she made her nervous. "I have laundry and things to do" which is ironic because that's why we hired someone-for companionship and support. I have learned the hard way that it's not for help for my mother, but rather for fun and outings. I digress, but try your church and they can steer you to a nonprofit org. which is usually cheaper.
Anonymous
Posted: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:42 PM
Originally posted by: Starling

What you are actually talking about is Medicaid which will put a floor under the community spouse so the sick spouse's expenses don't take up every penny leaving the community spouse poverty stricken.

I've done it. My husband has been in a nursing home for over a 15 months now and I ran out of money. I will be OK financially. I will survive. Without Medicaid I would not.
 
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