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Mozart isn't just for newborns
Internal Administrator
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Joined: 1/14/2015
Posts: 40463


Originally posted by: Cathy J. M.

Somehow I just ran across this article about the positive effect on AD patients, of listening to Mozart for a few minutes. (At least this "treatment" has no permanent side effects to worry about!)
Short-Term Improvement on a Visual-Spatial Task After Music Listening in Alzheimer's Disease

I think somewhere I have an old "Super-Learning" tape of music designed to enhance learning, based on the Russian approach to a certain number of beats per minute -- 70, I think. I'll find it and give it a go while we play UpWords or while my partner makes cards.

(I know some studies dispute any positive effect of Mozart -- for newborns or anyone -- but I think it's worth a go.)
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: crella

Glenn Miller is good too! When FIL was in the later stages and agitated Enya's 'A Day Without Rain' calmed him down very very well. Skip track 5 though, it's kind of a doom-and-gloom atmosphere.

In the mid-stages, I'd ham it up and sing along with the Supremes, he'd laugh all afternoon.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: bonniek

Although I love classical, my mom has a rich church history and seems to calm with hymn CDs. I also put in some things I like.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: Jim Broede

I know Mozart has a positive effect on me. I have a huge collection of Mozart. Haydn and Bach, too. --Jim
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: starshine

A good example of Baroque music is Vivald's 'Four Seasons'

Hope this helps.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: ValRe

I love classical, but also couldn't name anything but one. I'd google using "baroque Mozart".
I like Bach's Brandenburg Concertos. No crashing symbols or war-like sounding music.

Namaste.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: Cathy J. M.

Favorites here are "Songs that Got Us Through WWII" and "More Sing Along with Mitch Miller." This is for an 88-year-old, but I'm 66 and enjoy the music too.

Also, there's a hymn CD that's really wonderful for singing along, because the accompanying song book has HUGE print, and just the first verses are sung so the words are more familiar. You can get 10 songbooks plus the CD for $60. You should be able to order one songbook and the CD, but I don't see it right now on the site.
Activities and Gifts
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: Cathy J. M.

quote:
Originally posted by Memaw2287:
The aides at the NH use music all of the time, depending on the needs of the moment


What a good sign about the nursing home you picked!
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: starshine

Baroque may be the music you are thinking about. It has a life force beat. On the other side cacophonous,discordant music brings with it a negative force.

Have you ever found yourself irritable without reason? Often I have discovered it was the backgroung music in someone's house or in a store.

Nothing can sooth me like a flute.

Thanks for all the wonderful comments. They help.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: Alan. A

If there's a good classical radio station in your area, that can help, too. The programming usually isn't exclusively baroque/18th Century, but it tends to be mainstream and pretty soothing. When I moved my father to the nursing home, I bought him a small, simple table radio (the one by Tivoli Audio) and marked the dial with a Sharpie to call out the local classical station so the staff would be able to find it. It did him a lot of good, and when he died, I donated it to the nursing home so they could use it with others.

He was always a classical music fan so there was a degree of familiarity there. At an earlier stage of his illness, I bought him big band CDs from his childhood and youth, and he enjoyed those, but in a different way. At the end it was the more structured classical music that did him more good - Bach, Handel, Vivaldi... up to Mozart but not too far beyond.


Best,
Alan
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: Barb T

If anyone here could post the names of specific CDs you use for elders I would love to get the names to my mothers facility......those activity girls are so young I really doubt they can come up with the appropriate music for the ALZ/dementia group.....I would even buy them some to use! I just need help finding the right ones.....not much free time, working and caring and family.....you know! (do you know of a CD with old time hyms?)
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: Memaw2287

The aides at the NH use music all of the time, depending on the needs of the moment - classical, big band, symphonic and golden oldies. They even adjust the volume based on desired effect - soft to be background during "wind down" evening time, a bit louder to encourage activity (but not loud enough to discourage conversation or be distracting). Music holds a magical power.
Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, January 5, 2012 3:25 PM
Originally posted by: jellybeans

Okay, so baroque Mozart songs might be good.

I couldn't be much more clueless about Mozart or any music. Can anyone name a few baroque Mozart songs and I'll try to find a cd of them?
 
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