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Five Early Warning Signs of Alzheimer's
Myriam
Posted: Tuesday, January 22, 2013 4:04 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


(Source: TheTribute) - Think you're too young to worry about Alzheimer's? Most people - more than 5 million, according to latest counts - develop the disease after age 65. But 200,000 Americans have been diagnosed in their 40s and 50s.


Alzheimer's can't be prevented or cured, but the sooner you're diagnosed, the sooner you can take steps to manage symptoms and live better for longer. Memory loss is the most common sign, but not every lapse is symptomatic. Occasionally losing track of car keys can happen to anyone. But not remembering recently learned information, such as a conversation you just had, could be cause for concern. Other memory-related signs: forgetting important dates or asking for the same information over and over.

 

Also, struggling more to find the right words to identify objects is an early sign of Alzheimer's, as is difficulty expressing your thoughts or participating in conversations.

 

Go to full story:
http://www.greeleytribune.com


Lisa428
Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2013 5:09 PM
Joined: 12/5/2011
Posts: 795


Myriam,

 

Thanks for sharing and reminding others.

 

How are YOU?

 

 

Thinking of you.

 

Peace and Hope,

Lisa


Myriam
Posted: Monday, January 28, 2013 3:17 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Hi, Lisa. I'm doing great now. Plunged down to stage 3 and close to stage 4 after back surgery in October and another one in November, but I've popped back up to between 2 and 3, and am getting ready to travel to Texas for a speaking engagement about AD. Doing all I can to fight for a cure!
Iris L.
Posted: Monday, January 28, 2013 3:41 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18222


Good for you, Myriam!

Is this an Alzheimer's Association sponsored event or sponsored by a different group?  What will your talk be about?

Iris L.

Mimi S.
Posted: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 9:37 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


When the press give numbers in comparison, I wish they would be in the same terms. For example, what is the proportion of people diagnosed before age 60 compared to that after age 60. Hey, I began college as a math major so it should be easy for me. Is this 200 000 to 5 000 000. Crossing out the zeros does this make it 2 to 50 or 1 to 25? 

And there are possibly even more elderly people who are undiagnosed. So many of them are 1. Inadequately diagnosed and 2. Apt to think: oh well, nothing can be done about it.

The younger onset folks have a much more difficult time being diagnosed Once there, in my opinion, they are much more proactive in fighting to prolong their stay in Early Stage.

Just look at the activity in  our site for those with the disease and those in early stage. Days go by and there in no activity in the site for me.


Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 10:14 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18222


I have often wondered why there is not more activity on this I Have AD board.  On the old board there were more seniors active. 

Iris L.

Mimi S.
Posted: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 3:54 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Iris, 
I also wonder. When I try to get people in my own age to be more proactive, my comments above seem to  be what I get. 
What can b e done to get them to fight for themselves?

gregg1
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 10:41 AM
Joined: 1/14/2013
Posts: 81


I.m sorry I.m not to active yet but I want you all who are to know how appriated you are.I'm still digesting the diagnosis and what the future holds. Thanks so much for being here.


Iris L.
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 11:07 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18222


I see from your profile that you enjoy outdoor sports.  Stay active!  It's one of the habits that will help your brain.

I hope we can get more seniors involved in posting.

Iris L.

Mimi S.
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 3:38 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Gregg, Welcome to our site. Do learn as much as you can.

One of our members, Mike Donahue, whom I haven't heard from in too long, also shared your past. He wrote a book From AA to AD, a Travelogue.  Perhaps your library can find a copy for you.

Have you read about the Best Practices. Your activity lets me know you're on board with one of them: 


1. Take meds as directed.

2. Strenuous physical activity

 

3. Strenuous cognitive activity.

4.Mediterranean Diet. I also take antioxidants and Omega 3. Limited drinking and no smoking.

5. Maintain or increase social activity.


i4got
Posted: Saturday, February 16, 2013 4:01 PM
Joined: 2/16/2013
Posts: 1


I don't understand stages ... what exactly does it mean ? I guess I have some learning to do ...sigh ........
Iris L.
Posted: Saturday, February 16, 2013 4:39 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18222


Welcome to our online support group, i4got.  You are NOT defined by dementia!  You are still the same person you were.  But you may have to change your perspective in order to deal with the hand you have been dealt.

It has taken me a while to learn to live in the present and not live in the past or obsess about the future.  It's a learning process. 

One of the things I have learned from the other members are "work-arounds" to help me remember.  One tool is a notebook to jot things down in.  The other tool are two calendars--one for my wall and one in my purse, for my appointments and things to do. 

Make a daily and weekly routine for yourself.  This will help you.

Avoid stress.  One of our members, who was a psychotherapist, told us that stress reduces our cognition by HALF!  So don't stress!

Don't keep saying to other people, "I forgot."  If they are close to you, they should not be putting pressure on you to remember.  If they are not close to you, why bother?  They forget things, too!

The stages help to figure out what challenges are before us and where we are in this process.  Not everyone has all of the features of each stage, and some people overlap stages.  The stages are a tool to use, not a definition of us as a person.  Here is a link to one of the sites that explains the stages:
 http://www.alzinfo.org/clinical-stages-of-alzheimers  

I hope you continue to read the boards and to post whenever you have a question or a concern.  Feel free to begin your own thread to introduce yourself by clicking on the "Add topic" tab on the main Younger Onset page.

Have you made contact with your local chapter?  They can send you a packet of useful information and help you locate a support group, if there is one in your area.

Make note of the Best Practices that Mimi posted above.  They are very helpful.  I have made significant improvement in my functioning since beginning them.

Are you still working?

Iris L.


ffwife54@yahoo.com
Posted: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 7:28 PM
Joined: 4/15/2012
Posts: 247


Thanks IRIS you always keep me grounded in reality. I have been having a hard time planning a future...hubby wants to retire and work/travel, I don't know for how long or if and i can work/travel and it feels to me like I am being not fair to him to lead him down a road that may be a dead end.

 

I know i need to go with the flow but i can't when i want so badly to make sure he and my son and my new granddaughter will have a house and some finicial?  security.

 

Knowing these things are not in place cause me stress, trying to push to get them in place saddens and depresses me.

 

In addition my hubby is starting to get frustrated when i take to long to do something and treats me like a child.....and this is just the beginning, don't suggest he go to the caregiver board he won't

 

sorry had to vent


Mimi S.
Posted: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 8:51 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Hi FFwife, Are you still diagnosed in the MCI stage? If so rejoice. You have future plans made for what if, you've seen the Elder Law Attorney, so let hubby retire and travel.

He may need to do some taming down of his expectations. Perhaps he would agree to go with or without you for a consult with a social worker from your local Alzheimer's Chapter. Maybe you better not call her a social worker, just someone from the office.

I think worrying about the house, financial security and the grand kid, are not now yours to worry about. Easier said than done.

And yes, your and our goal is to take each day as it comes and go with the flow. Stress is not good for you and hubby, somehow, has to understand this.


hpuckett
Posted: Monday, March 4, 2013 12:19 PM
Joined: 1/17/2012
Posts: 5


Am 66yo male son of deceased Alz dad, and my mom who is in nursing home is vascular dementia. most of the men on my dad's side of the family had alz at different points in their lives, mostly after 70. so i should have a few more good years i believe, if i get it at all.

 

starting to see warnig signs in mys ownself, at this point it is mostly long-term memory access, and also an increasingly low frustration tolerance to even the simplest things. some panic now and then when i feel lost in the car, or in my thoughts. i startle very easily.

 

wife says am starting to be of concern to her.

 

any tips or reassurances will be appreciated.


Myriam
Posted: Monday, March 4, 2013 3:32 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Welcome, hpuckett.  Have you seen a doctor about your symptoms?  If not, it's important that you get a diagnosis.  It may be something that is fixable, but it's always best to get it checked out with your doctor.  Make sure the doctor you go to works with patients who have dementia symptoms. 

 

By the way, I'm 66 years old, too, and the daughter of a father who died with dementia. 


Iris L.
Posted: Monday, March 4, 2013 8:30 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18222


Another welcome, hpuckett.  Yes, by all means, visit your doctor for some preliminary blood tests and evaluation of your memory loss.  Don't rely solely on your PCP, because they don't know the details of memory loss.  You must see a neurologist who regularly diagnoses and treats dementia for a thorough evaluation.

Keep a record of what you and your wife are noticing.  Stress and anxiety worsen memory, so if you are under stress, try to ameliorate it.

Take a look at the 10 warning signs of dementia.  Dementia is more than absent-mindedness.
 
http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_know_the_10_signs.asp 

Keep reading and posting.  We are here to help.

Iris L.

 


hpuckett
Posted: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 4:09 AM
Joined: 1/17/2012
Posts: 5


Thanx myriam & iris for your kind replies. I will schedule a neurology visit soon then. Is it part of the process or just part of aging to sometimes feel like you are "losing your mind", and to start "measuring yourself". I try to not go there, but also am aware that i am in some sorta of slip-and-slide spiral down.

 

I have tried to start a journal, but i get so frustrated and foolish, i put it away.

 

will keep you posted, or atleast the site posted.


Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 9:31 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 18222


Hpuckett, you sound anxious.  Alzheimer's does not proceed quickly. Work on managing your anxiety.  Anxiety can cause all of the symptoms you are experiencing.  But this is not a diagnosis.  You need a thorough evaluation.

In the meantime, you must keep track of what you are experiencing.  It doesn't have to be a big journal.  Just jot down a few experiences as you notice them--a few sentences.  Ask your wife to jot down what she notices.  Then you will have something concrete to discuss with the doctor.

Work on reducing stress in your life.  This will help.

Iris L.


Teresa99
Posted: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 9:54 AM
Joined: 11/28/2012
Posts: 2225


I question the statistics as I don't know how they count.  My mother-in-law had dementia but died from lukemia.   There was no mention of dementia on her death certificate.
Mimi S.
Posted: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 9:20 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Teresa, Your question is lost in this thread.


Some doctors list all contributing diseases on the death cedrtificage. others don't.

Many families don't want it listed. Still that shame factor.

In my experience, same thing happens with alcoholism.


hpuckett
Posted: Wednesday, March 6, 2013 4:07 AM
Joined: 1/17/2012
Posts: 5


Thanx iris. i will do as you suggest. I am a computer programmer and so yes i tend to analyze too much. anxiety? i will consider your observation. my first cut is that yes, there are anxious moments, particularly when i sense the "slippage". sometimes i have the feeling that i am "looping".

 

suppose it could be stress, but no new stressors that i am aware of in my life. except these infernal aberrations in my mood, mind, and memory.

 

life is a dance, and oh how i dance. lol


 
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