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Neuropsych Test
Jshu43
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 3:42 PM
Joined: 4/4/2013
Posts: 42


I had a Neuropsych test yesterday and it will be two months before I see the Alzheimer doctor. I last saw her three years ago, and was diagnosed with Early Dementia MCA. I won't see her for results for another two months. I'm not sure how I did/

I did have a very hard time with the words and stories. But if they gave me hints, I often was able to remember some. I did much better when they asked if certain words were said. But just coming up with the words myself unaided, I really was very poor.

That seemed to be fairly worse than last time. But everything else may be the same. Just can't remember. I do feel that I have declined in the last few years. I just can't cope with organizing, and I stop mid sentience and don't know what I was saying. I misplace things a lot. I feel significantly dumber. If that makes sense. I really don't like being with others because I feel like they look at me funny.

Does any of that seem familiar to others?

My driving has suffered setbacks. I had two wrecks within two days. But I think the first was that I had been at hospital with my stepfather and just got too exhausted. My son says I am just too distracted.



Mimi S.
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 4:08 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 6090


Oh Jshu, Big hug for you. I do wish we had a system where we could actually chat.

I think it's horrible to wait two months for results. I know it's hard to advocate for yourself. Do you have some who can protest.

When you get the results back, if you have the previous results you should be able to compare.

Raw scores have little meaning, ask for results in perccentiles. But if the person won't oblige see if the name of the test is given. If the same, you can still tell if you went up or down.

Recall, with no help, is the most difficult memory task. If they give you any kind of a hint it makes it easier. So that's par for all.

Was it MCI you were diagnosed with? There's actually a very fine line between that and what is called Early Stage. It could be as simple as getting one more answer incorrect than you did on the previous neuro.

The car concerns me ore. Can you ease up on the driving for awhile? Keep the radio off. No talking with passengers, especially when a turn is coming up or there's traffic. Some folks can use a GPS; others the constant chatter is too distracting.

I certainly recall thinking I had remembered a lot about a story and finding out it was one of my poorer scores.

But then my neuro would ask and when was the last time I was asked to name all the animals I could remember starting with the letter K. Or when was the last ti, in real life you, were asked to retell the incidents in a story.

Even before you get the results, try making a list of the things you do well that are important in your daily life. What do you need help with?

You misplace things. Everything has a place and it ALWAYS gets returned to that place. But I still spend time looking for the reading glasses that don't hang around my neck.

Do call our help lie and ask where the nearest support group is for people with dementia? Also ask if your sate has an Early Stage Adviser. Call or e-mail that person.

Living Your Best With Early Stage Alzheimer's by Lisa Snyder is worth the price.

Keep chatting here.

Iris L.
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2015 8:26 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 14829


Are you on medication?

I agree, two months is too long to wait for results.

Two wrecks? It may be time to relinquish driving. Sign up for ACCESS disabled transportation now. Do you have a social worker who can help you with the forms?

I finally worked out a good system for my mail. I place all my mail into one big dish pan. Then, when I get a chance, I can separate out the bills. But at least I know where my mail is. It is not scattered about in piles all over my home.

Once we have a diagnosis of cognitive impairment or possible early dementia, I believe it would help us if the doctors would prepare us that we have to get used to a new way of living--a simpler, more focused way of living. It will be more rewarding if we are not wandering around in a state of confusion.

Iris L.



The_Sun_Still_Rises
Posted: Thursday, October 22, 2015 11:00 AM
Joined: 7/24/2015
Posts: 3030


Jshu43 wrote:

I did have a very hard time with the words and stories. But if they gave me hints, I often was able to remember some. I did much better when they asked if certain words were said. But just coming up with the words myself unaided, I really was very poor.


That seemed to be fairly worse than last time. But everything else may be the same. Just can't remember. I do feel that I have declined in the last few years. I just can't cope with organizing, and I stop mid sentience and don't know what I was saying. I misplace things a lot. I feel significantly dumber. If that makes sense. I really don't like being with others because I feel like they look at me funny.


Does any of that seem familiar to others?

----------------------------------------


Much of that seems very familiar. I was diagnosed with Major Neurocognitive Disorder (not mild, or moderate), which is the new fancy term for dementia. The lady who did the report thought possibly due to physical health condition, but subjected that to being ruled out. The Neurologist I saw, just ruled out the medical part and said is Alzheimer's. I too am Young Onset, since I am under the age 65.


The difference between MCI and AD is one of degrees. My understanding is it goes MCI > Mild Neurocognitive Disorder > Moderate Neurocognitive Disorder > Major Neurocognitive Disorder. However, when I think back to 4-5-6 years ago, there is a HUGE difference in my ability to function in my daily life between those times. 6 years ago, I likely would have been MCI. Mine has been a steady progressive decline.


You make complete sense to me. The wait is hard. The results are harder. The aftermath hard too. One day at a time.


The best advice I got, is that you are still you no matter what the test says. The test is just one snapshot in time. Whatever you have, you had before the test. And you will still be you, after the test. YOU, your you-ness, does not change because of the test.


While you wait, a proactive thing you can do is to start researching and coming to understand what each of the various parts of cognition are (ie working memory, executive function, short term memory, etc.), and what they really mean. It will help you to understand your high and low scores, and how that actually translates into impact on your life.


Learning the various parts of cognition also helped, I found, to answer what was my ever-present question at the time - why are some things so easy and some things so hard, even on the test?


Taking on the task of organizing can be daunting and hard, being organized can help a great deal. Regarding misplacing things, I made rules for myself, that certain things only ever go in certain places...like my keys by the door, or to never set my phone down in an unusual place. It can help to label things. Sometimes, certain adaptations seem silly (like labeling things), but then...after you do it, there is a relief. Sometimes it is hard to gauge the stress of carrying information around in our heads with us.


Stress makes cognition worse. So maybe spend the next couple months doing some nice things for yourself. Maybe read a good book. Things to distract you and help time pass.


Sounds like you have had a report before, but if not, what will come back will be a lengthy, somewhat hard to decipher step by step set of numbers of each of the test results. If you are lucky, the author will parenthesis the tests in various comments they make. They will be a diagnosis in the back, along with suggestions.


Somewhere in there, it may use the word "probable" that is the highest, most affirmative answer they can give you...as they can only be sure on autopsy..."probable" means you have it. It does not answer why you have it, or if it is something fixable like Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.


Their will be a section on emotional and mental health, and at the go-over, you will want to ask upfront and be clear, could depression or anxiety cause this - because those are fixable. Either way, you will appreciate knowing that answer over time and in many varying contexts.


I thought I aced parts of the test, only to find I had really low scores in them. Maybe little girding yourself in prep for that. The report often stings a bit.


The stories, I could only follow the first paragraphs...could answer none of the questions after a time. How you say about with help, my report says that I am much better when cued than when I try to freely recall information. <--- This is where CG's and others could be especially useful, and helpful.


Feeling dumber, totally makes sense to me. My IQ dropped from 163 (or to 86.


Withdrawal is pretty normal. Hard to stay wanting to be around people when it is obvious you are struggling. I think it is a self-preservation instinct.


Hang in there. What will be will be...and two months really will pass...and the sun will keep rising.


 
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