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How long will I live?
Fish and fishing
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 3:43 PM
Joined: 5/23/2018
Posts: 1


Google says one can die after 4 years from diagnosis!
Iris L.
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:31 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 15458


Welcome Fish and fishing.  I was told the same thing in 2009.  Guess what?  I'm still here.  So are Mimi S. and Michael and others.  No one, even your own doctor, knows how long a PWD (person with dementia) will live.  First of all, is it truly dementia?  There are many dementia mimics that must be ruled out by a thorough medical and neurological evaluation.  Also, many PWDs die of the most common causes of death, which are heart disease and cancer.  The course of the dementias can run 10 to 20 years or more.  There is a thread about when we had our earliest symptoms on the Younger Onset board.  


For many PWDs, unfortunately, by the time they are diagnosed, they are already in the middle to late stages of their disease.  What we aim to do on this board is to use lifestyle habits to prolong the early stages.  These are not a guarantee, but they can help.    Nevertheless, PWDs have to come to terms with having a serious illness.  I call us Dementia Pioneers, because we are the first generation of patients who are proactive in our own care and we can take steps to help ourselves.  We support each other in this.  We can still have a fulfilling life.  


Please tell us more about yourself.  I take it you love fishing.  Please keep posting, and join us in supporting each other.  


Iris L.


Mimi S.
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:57 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 6636


Welcome to our world Fish and Fishing. We're so glad you found us.

I do echo what Iris wrote. Too many other variables are involved. 

 At what stage of the disease was the diagnosis made.  What is the health condition of the patient?  Other problems that may develop.

Do get involved in what we call Best Practices. Various research have shown that eaCH, INDIvIDUALLY MY PROLONG THE EARLIER sTAGES OF THE DISEASE AnD IN COMBINATION, THERE IS A MULTIPLYING EFFECT.

1. Take meds as directed.

2 Increase physical activity. The goal is to get the heart pumping at a faster rate for a bit.

3. Cognitive Activities. A variety is best. You aim for stimulation but not frustration.  You don't need the fancy ones you pay for.

4. Mediterranean Diet. Search the internet. No smoking and limited alcohol.

5. Socialization. You need interaction with others.


Mimi S.
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 6:01 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 6636


Welcome to our world Fish and Fishing. We're so glad you found us.

I do echo what Iris wrote. Too many other variables are involved. 

 At what stage of the disease was the diagnosis made.  What is the health condition of the patient?  Other problems that may develop.

Do get involved in what we call Best Practices. Various research have shown that eaCH, INDIvIDUALLY MY PROLONG THE EARLIER sTAGES OF THE DISEASE AnD IN COMBINATION, THERE IS A MULTIPLYING EFFECT.

1. Take meds as directed.

2 Increase physical activity. The goal is to get the heart pumping at a faster rate for a bit.

3. Cognitive Activities. A variety is best. You aim for stimulation but not frustration.  You don't need the fancy ones you pay for.

4. Mediterranean Diet. Search the internet. No smoking and limited alcohol.

5. Socialization. You need interaction with others.


MissHer
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 10:23 PM
Joined: 11/13/2014
Posts: 1972


My mom has been on this journey for almost 20 years, after a stroke. She complained then of losing her memory but I never picked up on it. sadly
Horse Lover
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2018 11:52 PM
Joined: 11/4/2017
Posts: 122


My sister had symptoms for a few years before her diagnosis at age 58.  She is now 70.  My mother showed symptoms as far back as 1974 (maybe even earlier).  She passed in 2010.  I was diagnosed last year.  How long one lives after diagnosis is as unique as the individual themself.  There is no way of knowing for sure how long you will live.  What I have learned is to stop worrying about when I'm going to die and start focusing on making every day count.  I want to enjoy as much of the time that I have left as I possibly can.  I can't make memories for myself, but I can make memories for my husband, children, grandchildren and other family and friends.  I want them to remember me for the good times that we have had together and not for giving up after my diagnosis.  I want everyone around me to see that, after diagnosis, there is still time to live and time to get our affairs in order.  It is like a chance to right the wrongs before I get too bad.  I hope this helps somehow.
Mike&BrendaTX
Posted: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 9:52 PM
Joined: 7/10/2017
Posts: 365


My wife started some early symptoms at age 59.  She is now 73 and is still walking around and is still "here", although her communication is difficult.  She's otherwise healthy, so it may be several more years.  Everyone is different, but I wouldn't count on only 4 years!

Mike


 
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