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Hope for Alzheimer's
Myriam
Posted: Monday, August 13, 2012 4:33 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


From Alzheimer's Daily News:


(Source: Medscape) - Dr. Martin Farlow, Professor of Neurology at the Alzheimer's Center at Indiana University School of Medicine, reports a number of exciting studies were presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. Here are three in particular:


Randy Bateman and colleagues of the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network Consortium found that:

 

  • 20 years before dementia onset, beta-amyloid levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to drop; 15 years before dementia onset, beta-amyloid deposits can be detected by amyloid imaging scans, tau levels begin rising in cerebrospinal fluid, and atrophy of the brain begins to become detectable by MRI; 
  • 10 years before dementia onset, brain metabolic changes are present on FDG-PET and the first hints of episodic memory deficits begin; and 
  • 5 years before dementia onset, patients develop mild cognitive impairment.

This is the first time line of events suggesting the need for early intervention, with available biomarkers that can be measured to assess the effects of drug therapy.

 

A second presentation by Kari Stefansson and colleagues reported finding a mutation that may reduce risk for Alzheimer's disease by as much as 5-7 times compared with the general population. The mutation is in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene and appears to interfere with the ability of beta-secretase to act on APP cleavage, inhibiting creation of beta-amyloid protein. This study represents a natural experiment confirming for the first time that lower beta-amyloid levels are associated with lower risk for Alzheimer's disease and may further help guide drug development.

 

Dr. Farlow presented a poster describing the Novartis ACTIVE study that investigated the effects of the rivastigmine 13.3-mg patch vs. the 4.6-mg patch in patients with severe Alzheimer's disease. This was a 24-week, double-blind trial conducted in 98 centers across the United States, in patients with Mini-Mental State Examination scores of 3-12 at baseline.

 

Patients did statistically significantly better on the primary outcome measures, which suggests that the 13.3-mg rivastigmine patch, which is not currently approved by regulatory authorities, may have a future role in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

 

Go to full story: http://www.medscape.com


Geegee
Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2012 7:34 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 514


Thanks Myriam!  Exciting new for early diagnosis!
bela
Posted: Thursday, September 27, 2012 1:40 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 4122


 

Patients did statistically significantly better on the primary outcome measures, which suggests that the 13.3-mg rivastigmine patch, which is not currently approved by regulatory authorities, may have a future role in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.?

 

There is that carrot dangling in front of me again...we all want hope don't we? My mom has AD. Why isn't it approved yet boy if i could i would just slap on 2 exelon patches and do it myself....so sad

Some time ago there was the hope of a drug but the cost was so expensive in the thousands of dollars that only millionaire and billionaire individuals could afford it if it was approved...so sad.

 

 

 
 

Myriam
Posted: Friday, September 28, 2012 12:45 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


Bela, it was approved earlier this month. It is in the process of manufaturing and shipping to pharmacies. My doctor called in the 13.5 prescription for me, so as soon as my pharmacy receives it, I'll get it.
 
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