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60 Minutes episode on People Aged 90+ Sunday May 4, 2014
Iris L.
Posted: Sunday, May 4, 2014 10:21 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17695


Here is a link to the entire show.  The 90+ story starts at ~15 minutes. 

 

There was a university study on members of a retirement community beginning from 1981 with 60 year olds.  Now these people are in their 90's and early 100's.   

 

There's good information about dementia.  Not everyone with dementia has plaques and tangles in their brain, and not everyone with plaques and tangles has dementia. 

  

http://www.cbs.com/shows/60_minutes/video/dRWD3hwiSX1mgZ_KUyERm9Fx8vUW_s42/over-a-barrel-90-/  

 

Iris L. 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Sunday, May 4, 2014 10:41 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5027


Thanks for posting the link to the 60 Minutes segment on dementia. Iris.  I did not know it was going to be on and just happened to catch the last five minutes or so.  I went back and read the transcript.  Hopefully, the program may change some people's minds about the relationship or lack of relationship between plaques and tangles and Alzheimer's disease.  One could say that the people without the plaques and tangles had another form of dementia (and that may be true in some cases), but it does not explain the people who have the plaques and tangles and do not have dementia at all. Once Alzheimer's disease (and likely many other forms of dementia) are defined not by plaques and tangles, but by oxidation and inflammation then the real work on effectively treating dementia can begin.
Mimi S.
Posted: Monday, May 5, 2014 9:45 AM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Bob DeMarco also had a link. 

Do watch both segments. 

The post-mortem brain studies interested me. If you died with no signs of dementia, you could still have plaques and tangles.

Some of those who died with  signs of dementia but no plaques and tangles, showed multiple microfarcts, tiny strokes. Don’t recall if that was all or some.


Myriam
Posted: Monday, May 5, 2014 2:13 PM
Joined: 12/6/2011
Posts: 3326


What a baffling disease!
Iris L.
Posted: Monday, May 5, 2014 2:24 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17695


Thanks for the reminder about the microinfarcts, Mimi.  The rheumatologist told me my diagnosis, cognitive impairment nos, is from antiphospholipid syndrome, which cause microinfarcts.   

 

I mentioned this to one of the researchers affiliated with the researcher on the 60 Minutes episode at a conference, and she was completely uninterested.  I think it bears looking into.  APS is more common that doctors believe.

Iris L.
 


Mimi S.
Posted: Monday, May 5, 2014 6:07 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


Hi Iris,

It is frustrating when we present a great idea to a researcher and we are brushed off. 


jfkoc
Posted: Tuesday, May 6, 2014 8:38 AM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 20398


It seems that more and more evidence points to oxidation, inflammation etc. as a major factor in our health. In other words things we DO have some control over..our activity and what we eat.


My Dr has put together a detox program which I am going to participate in starting Monday. It is not way out there and others have said it is doable. 
 
There is also the World Summit on Diabetes 2014 going on. It is a series of 12 days of talks online. Emphasis on activity and diet. I started but had trouble hearing....I guess looking at "mouths" talking has now become important to me....lol
www.thediabetessummit.com

Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, May 6, 2014 11:36 AM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17695


Thanks for the info about the diabetes summit, jfkoc.  I didn't want to register.  I was diagnosed as diabetic a few years ago (A1C was 7 point eight.  I cut back on carbs, and now my A1C is 5.8--I'm no longer diabetic. 

I too believe that many people develop dementia from inflammatory causes, as yet unknown to the doctors and researchers.  I believe that is why there is so much variability in dementia presentation.

Iris L.

Lane Simonian
Posted: Tuesday, May 6, 2014 11:53 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 5027


Here is some evidence that the oxidant that I blame for Alzheimer's disease--peroxynitrite--also contributes to type 2 diabetes.



 2011;18(2):280-90.

Peroxynitrite-driven mechanisms in diabetes and insulin resistance - the latest advances.

Abstract

Since its discovery, peroxynitrite has been known as a potent oxidant in biological systems, and a rapidly growing body of literature has characterized its biochemistry and role in the pathophysiology of various conditions. Either directly or by inducing free radical pathways, peroxynitrite damages vital biomolecules such as DNA, proteins including enzymes with important functions, and lipids. It also initiates diverse reactions leading eventually to disrupted cell signaling, cell death, and apoptosis. The potential role and contribution of this deleterious species has been the subject of investigation in several important diseases, including but not limited to, cancer, neurodegeneration, stroke, inflammatory conditions, cardiovascular problems, and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes-related complications represent a major health problem at epidemic levels. Therefore, tremendous efforts have been put into investigation of the molecular basics of peroxynitrite-related mechanisms in diabetes. Studies constantly seek new therapeutical approaches in order to eliminate or decrease the level of peroxynitrite, or to interfere with its downstream mechanisms. This review is intended to emphasize the latest findings about peroxynitrite and diabetes, and, in addition, to discuss recent and novel advances that are likely to contribute to a better understanding of peroxynitrite-mediated damage in this disease.



Iris L.
Posted: Monday, September 1, 2014 1:22 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17695


This show about 90+ year old adults was repeated on 60 Minutes last night.  I enjoyed watching it again.  An important point is that not everyone who has plaques and tangles in their brain at autopsy had dementia.  The researcher said possibly something the person was doing was able to overcome the plaques and tangles.  This is a hypothesis.  More research is needed.

 

As far as Best Practices, the exercise does not have to be vigorous.  Moderate exercise and moderate exertion are okay. 

Anything to keep the brain stimulated is beneficial.  Many of the residents did board games and card games.

The newcomers to the board may be interested in watching this tv segment.

The link is above.  The 90+ segments starts at ~15 minutes.

Iris L.


Mimi S.
Posted: Monday, September 1, 2014 7:05 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 7027


If you go to 60 Minutes, you can just click on the 90 + study.

 

And gone completely from my memory was the fact that, evidenced by my remarks above, I'd watched it.

 

Vascular may play a bigger role than we now suspect.

 

And that "new " scan is the Pittsburg Compound scan. I've seen pictures many times before.

Just 90 + spot.

http://www.cbs.com/shows/60_minutes/video/MPjv3QHhkZjrJ_0G5PeC7zYVaKuJsl8V/living-to-90-and-beyond-part-two-/


Iris L.
Posted: Monday, September 1, 2014 8:07 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 17695



Thanks for the direct link, Mimi.  Isn't it fascinating?

Iris L.

 
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