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Supplements: Curcumin, Astaxanthin, EPPS, Ginkgo biloba, Aloe vera, Omega-3 fatty acids
j03y
Posted: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 8:57 PM
Joined: 1/22/2017
Posts: 3


Does anyone have thoughts on the efficacy of supplements such as Curcumin, Astaxanthin, EPPS, Ginkgo biloba, Aloe vera, and Omega-3 fatty acids on a person with mid-stage Alzheimer's?

My gut reaction is that such things will have no noticeable affect on the patient.



Lane Simonian
Posted: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 9:16 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 3931


Curcumin is a good antioxidant but does not enter the bloodstream well.  Piperine increases its absorption.  Various scientists have tried to develop forms of curcumin that might make it to the brain better, but which ones work best and how well they work is still an open question.

Omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease but may not help treat it.

The studies on Ginkgo biloba for Alzheimer's disease have produced varying and inconclusive results.

There was one small study on aloe vera for Alzheimer's disease a few years ago, but I have not seen anything since.

The studies on astaxanthin for Alzheimer's disease are preliminary.

Clinical trial evidence suggests that the combination of Korean red ginseng and aromatherapy provides an effective treatment for moderate Alzheimer's disease.

A 24-week randomized open-label study with Korean red ginseng (KRG) showed cognitive benefits in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. To further determine long-term effect of KRG, the subjects were recruited to be followed up to 2 yr. Cognitive function was evaluated every 12 wk using the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS) and the Korean version of the Mini Mental Status Examination (K-MMSE) with the maintaining dose of 4.5 g or 9.0 g KRG per d. At 24 wk, there had been a significant improvement in KRG-treated groups. In the long-term evaluation of the efficacy of KRG after 24 wk, the improved MMSE score remained without significant decline at the 48th and 96th wk. ADAS-cog showed similar findings. Maximum improvement was found around week 24. In conclusion, the effect of KRG on cognitive functions was sustained for 2 yr follow-up, indicating feasible efficacies of long-term follow-up for Alzheimer’s disease.

RESULTS:

All patients showed significant improvement in personal orientation related to cognitive function on both the GBSS-J and TDAS after therapy. In particular, patients with AD showed significant improvement in total TDAS scores. Result of routine laboratory tests showed no significant changes, suggesting that there were no side-effects associated with the use of aromatherapy. Results from Zarit's score showed no significant changes, suggesting that caregivers had no effect on the improved patient scores seen in the other tests.

CONCLUSIONS:

In conclusion, we found aromatherapy an efficacious non-pharmacological therapy for dementia. Aromatherapy may have some potential for improving cognitive function, especially in AD patients.


The second study used rosemary, lemon, lavender, and orange essential oils via a diffuser, but direct inhalation of the above oils plus clove, bay laurel, and lemon balm essential oils would have likely led to even greater improvements.



j03y
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2017 12:33 PM
Joined: 1/22/2017
Posts: 3


Thank you for this info.


Lane Simonian
Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2017 5:00 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 3931


You are welcome.  I keep trying to figure out which antioxidants may help treat the disease and which ones do little to no good.
 
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