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Good Foods That help
Kaarl Harster
Posted: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 11:15 AM
Joined: 6/14/2017
Posts: 8


I've been working on creating a smoothie that seems to help my wife feel better and more energy.  it takes about 2 to 3 weeks to see results. Just one 16oz smoothie every morning.Good brain booster.

 Here is a good morning smoothie!
- 1 cup Unsweetened vanilla Almond milk
- Hand full of blueberries
- Almost a full hand full of Kale. Steam and all except for really thick steams.
- 1 teaspoon Coconut oil
- Half a hand full of mixed frozen berries
- Half banana
- Couple dashes of cinnamon
- ** Small chunk of raw red beets (energy booster)
- ** 2in x 2in strip of Noni fruit leather cut up into smaller peace's.  You order it online from Hawaii, Kauai actually. It's great for fighting depression and gives you energy.
I've seen a great improvement in my wife that has early onset Alzheimer's.
She has more energy and happier.
Look it up on the internet http://www.real-noni.com.
It does taste and smell weird but mixed with the other good stuff you can't tell its in there.
And that's it. Great results!

For those with allergies, add 1 teaspoon of bee pollen.
Find some local to where you live. Find a beehive buddy near you. Local because it will help with the allergy stuff floating around your home town.
Good stuff!


stillanurse
Posted: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 12:49 PM
Joined: 6/12/2017
Posts: 4


Interesting concoction. I copied the ingred. My husband isn't at the stage where he refuses food yet. His thing now is sweets-seems to crave them. Thanks for posting what helps.
Kaarl Harster
Posted: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 2:13 PM
Joined: 6/14/2017
Posts: 8


No Problem, I hope it helps. It actually makes about 16oz not 20oz. I fixed the original post.

Keep me posted. I'm curious to see if it helps him. We'll keep you and him in prayer.


PCMc
Posted: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 3:30 PM
Joined: 10/22/2014
Posts: 20


We are going to give your smoothie a try.  Here is something else that has worked to help DH's mood and outlook. DH doesn't want me to add any sweetener for him but you could add anything really to dress it up (sweetener, nuts, caramel,etc) as long as it has the two main ingredients.

Cocoa Powder & Coconut Oil Cubes

Put 1tbsp each of raw cocoa powder and organic coconut oil in each section of an ice cube tray, mix up each section and put in the refrigerator to harden. Add a couple drops of agave nector or other sweetner if you like. 

Hint:  If the coconut oil is too solid at room temperature to mix put it in the microwave for 15-30 seconds 1st to liquify. Take one cube a day either in your coffee, on toast, by itself or whatever works for you.

A friend of ours told us how this helped his Aunt with AD and we have found that after about 2 weeks we've noticed and improvement in my husbands overall mood. It's not a cure but it is improving our overall quality of life.


Kaarl Harster
Posted: Thursday, June 15, 2017 11:12 AM
Joined: 6/14/2017
Posts: 8


Great Ideas. Thanks for sharing!
jb crick
Posted: Thursday, June 15, 2017 11:21 AM
Joined: 8/2/2016
Posts: 264


I clicked on the JPEG link and all I got was "page not found".
Kaarl Harster
Posted: Thursday, June 15, 2017 1:57 PM
Joined: 6/14/2017
Posts: 8


Sorry, I was missing a "-" in the name. Please try http://www.real-noni.com

I made the correction in the original post.

Thank you jb crick


Kaarl Harster
Posted: Friday, June 16, 2017 9:56 AM
Joined: 6/14/2017
Posts: 8


Couple of things I do that help when making smoothies is to freeze the bananas so they will keep longer. Peel the bananas and cut them in half and just put them in a zip look freezer bag and freeze them.. Helps make the smoothie cold and creamy.

Also cut the Red beets up in to small junks about 1in or so and again ziplock freezer bag. also helps make the smoothie cold and the beets last longer.

 


shalimar7
Posted: Friday, June 16, 2017 10:05 AM
Joined: 2/16/2012
Posts: 22


At home we use 4 oranges, 2 bags of chopped kale (kale needs to rest in water for a bit before running into the juicer to help it extract more of its juices) Also, we add 4 green apples, 1lb of carrots, 2 bunches of ginger (if its too spicy add less) and 2 lemons.
This is great for energy, digestion and inflammation. You can do pure shots of ginger with lemon but if you have sensitive stomach you may not want to try.

Kaarl Harster
Posted: Friday, June 16, 2017 10:05 AM
Joined: 6/14/2017
Posts: 8


Sausage Kale Soup is always good for the brain when you double up on the kale.

    1 tablespoon olive oil
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    1/4 teaspoon crushed red-pepper flakes
    5 waxy potatoes (1 1/2 pounds), peeled and cut into 1/2-inch chunks
    3 cans (14 1/2 ounces each) reduced-sodium chicken broth
    1 bunch kale (12 ounces), stemmed and shredded - I always add more then this!
    12 ounces smoked chicken sausage, cut into 1/2-inch half moons

Directions

    In a large pot (6 to 8 quarts), heat oil over medium. Add onion and cook until soft, stirring, 2 to 3 minutes. Add garlic and red-pepper flakes; cook unti fragrant, 1 minute. Add potatoes and broth; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer until potatoes are tender, 10 to 15 minutes.

    In a blender, puree half the soup. Return to pot; add kale and sausage. Simmer until kale is wilted, 10 to 15 minutes.



Kaarl Harster
Posted: Friday, June 16, 2017 10:10 AM
Joined: 6/14/2017
Posts: 8


If you can handle it, Warm Brussels Sprout Salad With Bacon and Hazelnut Vinaigrette is very good. Brussels Sprouts are very good for the brain.

12 ounces Brussels sprouts
    3/4 cup hazelnuts
    1 small shallot, finely minced (about 2 tablespoons)
    1 tablespoon honey
    1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
    1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
    3 ounces bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

    1.

    Trim off bottoms of Brussels sprouts and separate the leaves that are released. Transfer leaves to a large bowl. Continue trimming off the bottom and removing released leaves until only the very central core remains.
    2.

    Thinly slice the central core and transfer to the bowl with the released leaves. Discard trimmed bottoms.
    3.

    Pound hazelnuts in a mortar and pestle or under a small skillet until roughly chopped then transfer to a medium bowl. Add shallots, honey, vinegar, and olive oil and set aside.
    4.

    Spread bacon in a medium cast iron or non stick skillet and place over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring frequently, until completely crisp and fat has rendered, about 4 minutes total. Using a slotted spoon, Transfer bacon to a small bowl. Pour two tablespoons bacon fat into bowl with hazelnut mixture and whisk to combine. Season hazelnut mixture to taste with salt and pepper.
    5.

    Return skillet with remaining bacon fat to high heat and heat until lightly smoking. Add Brussels sprouts, spread into an even layer, season with salt and pepper, and cook without moving for 1 minute. Stir and continue cooking, shaking and stirring constantly, until leaves are bright green and just starting to turn tender, about 1 minute longer. Transfer to a large bowl. Add bacon and dressing and toss to combine. Serve immediately.


Kaarl Harster
Posted: Friday, June 16, 2017 10:44 AM
Joined: 6/14/2017
Posts: 8


I like it! Thanks for sharing that.Shelimar7.
Crushed
Posted: Saturday, June 17, 2017 6:30 AM
Joined: 2/2/2014
Posts: 2768


Three words

Blood- Brain -Barrier http://neuroscience.uth.tmc.edu/s4/chapter11.html

None of the concoctions described above are bad for anyone.  BUT before anyone makes claims that a food is beneficial for the brain they must explain which component gets past the blood brain barrier and how.  

In addition in the elderly the BB is weakened.  Not everything in food is good for the brain.

 

 


jfkoc
Posted: Saturday, June 17, 2017 8:18 AM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 13474


I would always add some protein powder especially to a fruit based smoothie which is heavy with sugar,.
Crushed
Posted: Saturday, June 17, 2017 9:12 AM
Joined: 2/2/2014
Posts: 2768


jfkoc wrote:
I would always add some protein powder especially to a fruit based smoothie which is heavy with sugar,.

I'm just amused.  do you put steak on a cake?  It's important that the diet include protein but but what is the point about the shake?  It is a myth that eating protein slows the absorption of carbohydrates:

"

  • "Don't eat fruit, fruit juice, or a sweet for a snack without also eating a source of protein to slow the absorption of carbohydrate." In none of the studies reviewed did added protein slow or change the peak postprandial glucose response.http://journal.diabetes.org/diabetesspectrum/00v13n3/pg132.htm


jfkoc
Posted: Saturday, June 17, 2017 10:13 AM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 13474


Explanation...when we got to "shakes" at our home they were in place of meals thus the added protein.
elainechem
Posted: Saturday, June 17, 2017 11:20 AM
Joined: 7/30/2013
Posts: 5262


I just got my copy of Neurology Now. It has a good article about what the research says about foods that may help with various neurological disorders, including AD. I hope the link works. 

http://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2017/13030/Brain_Food__Can_the_foods_you_eat_enhance_brain.16.aspx 

 


Crushed
Posted: Saturday, June 17, 2017 1:34 PM
Joined: 2/2/2014
Posts: 2768


 

The article says nothing about "foods" as such being good, its about DIETS.  

 

 as the article says linked to a lower level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, which builds up deposits in the walls of the arteries. Less LDL cholesterol means a clearer pathway for blood to travel from the heart to the brain, which reduces the risk of stroke and vascular dementia. The diet may also reduce both inflammation and blood pressure, which in turn lowers the risk of stroke and dementia.

I'm the family cook for 42 years and a one time professor in Home Economics where I taught the legal issues involved in health food claims.  If you can get LDL down through diet the effects are profound.  No one disagrees with that. The question of an direct effect on Alzheimer's is less clear. 

I manage DWs Cholesterol and Lipids through diet alone. 

What no one knows is whether it's stuff in the diet, or what is NOT in the diet that is critical  

 

 

  


elainechem
Posted: Saturday, June 17, 2017 8:26 PM
Joined: 7/30/2013
Posts: 5262


Regarding cholesterol: I think we're at the point that hubby probably won't live long enough to die of heart disease. And, if he did suddenly suffer a massive heart attack, that might be a blessing, you know?
Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 9:59 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4063


Some of this is a matter of semantics.  Food makes up diet.  Foods which contain polyphenols such as in a Mediterranean diet or spices in a diet from India may be useful in reducing the risk for Alzheimer's disease and slowing down its progression.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16622828

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2673956/

http://www.parentherald.com/articles/64091/20160830/traditional-indian-food-prevents-alzheimer-s-disease-50-experts-claimed.htm

The spice that receives the most attention is turmeric (which contains curcumin) but curcumin does not enter the bloodstream readily.  However, black pepper in a diet from India increases its absorption.  And other spices in this diet have a beneficial effect as well.

Most but not all polyphenols cross the blood brain barrier.  

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3372091/

Polyphenols limit the formation of peroxynitrite, scavenge peroxynitrite, and partially reverse the oxidative and nitrative damage done by peroxynitrite.  This leads to more blood flow and increased glucose transport in the brain which reduces delusions, an increased synthesis and release of neurotransmitters needed for the retrieval of short-term memory, sleep, mood, social recognition and alertness, limits the death of neurons, and restarts some regeneration of neurons.

The best polyphenolic peroxynitrite scavengers are called methoxyphenols: they include curcumin, ferulic acid, syringic acid, sinapic acid, and vanillin.  Methoxyphenols are excellent hydrogen donors which make them excellent antioxidants.  Korean red ginseng contains two methoxyphenol peroxynitrite scavengers--ferulic acid and syringic acid. Well I know people like picking apart the limitations of these studies, either find me a pharmaceutical drug that has performed as well or run larger, randomized, placebo controlled studies to see what happens.

Improvement of Cognitive Deficit in Alzheimer’s Disease Patients by Long Term Treatment with Korean Red Ginseng

A 24-week randomized open-label study with Korean red ginseng (KRG) showed cognitive benefits in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. To further determine long-term effect of KRG, the subjects were recruited to be followed up to 2 yr. Cognitive function was evaluated every 12 wk using the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS) and the Korean version of the Mini Mental Status Examination (K-MMSE) with the maintaining dose of 4.5 g or 9.0 g KRG per d. At 24 wk, there had been a significant improvement in KRG-treated groups. In the long-term evaluation of the efficacy of KRG after 24 wk, the improved MMSE score remained without significant decline at the 48th and 96th wk. ADAS-cog showed similar findings. Maximum improvement was found around week 24. In conclusion, the effect of KRG on cognitive functions was sustained for 2 yr follow-up, indicating feasible efficacies of long-term follow-up for Alzheimer’s disease.


 2012 Nov;15(6):278-82. doi: 10.1179/1476830512Y.0000000027.

Heat-processed ginseng enhances the cognitive function in patients with moderately severe Alzheimer's disease.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Ginseng has been reported to improve cognitive function in animals and in healthy and cognitively impaired individuals. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a heat-processed form of ginseng that contains more potent ginsenosides than raw ginseng in the treatment of cognitive impairment in patients with moderately severe Alzheimer's disease (AD).

METHODS:

Forty patients with AD were randomized into one of three different dose groups or the control group as follows: 1.5 g/day (n = 10), 3 g/day (n = 10), and 4.5 g/day (n = 10) groups, or control (n = 10). The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were used to assess cognitive function for 24 weeks.

RESULTS:

The treatment groups showed significant improvement on the MMSE and ADAS. Patients with higher dose group (4.5 g/day) showed improvements in ADAS cognitive, ADAS non-cognitive, and MMSE score as early as at 12 weeks, which sustained for 24-week follow-up.

DISCUSSION:

These results demonstrate the potential efficacy of a heat-processed form of ginseng on cognitive function and behavioral symptoms in patients with moderately severe AD.


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 10:17 AM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4063


I saw the reference to cocoa powder above, so I will add this (although heavily processed cocoa does not work as well).

The inflammatory mediator peroxynitrite, when generated in excess, may damage cells by oxidizing and nitrating cellular components. Defense against this reactive species may be at the level of prevention of the formation of peroxynitrite, at the level of interception, or at the level of repair of damage caused by peroxynitrite. Several selenocompounds serve this purpose and include selenoproteins such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), selenoprotein P and thioredoxin reductase, or low-molecular-weight substances such as ebselen. Further, flavonoids, such as (-)-epicatechin, which occurs in green tea or cocoa as monomer or in the form of oligomers, can contribute to cellular defense against peroxynitrite.

On the negative side of the diet ledger: foods high in sodium, and sugar and carbohydrates increase oxidation in the brain.  This process begins by increasing myo-inositol levels in the brain (myo-inositol is a good biomarker for conversion to Alzheimer's disease).  

http://www.docguide.com/myo-inositol-n-acetylaspartate-are-sensitive-biomarkers-conversion-mci-alzheimers-disease?tsid=5

Individuals with Down syndrome also have high levels of myo-inositol in their brains and also high levels of amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau (two supposed hallmarks of Alzheimer's disesae), but not all go on to develop Alzheimer's disease.  One of the reasons for this is that individuals with Down syndrome also have high levels of hydrogen sulfide (which in itself can cause mental impairment but is also a peroxynitrite scavenger).

Cholesterol is a less straight forward risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.  Cholesterol does not enter the brain unless the blood-brain barrier is damaged, so high levels of cholesterol are not likely a problem in the absence of large scale oxidative stress.

High consumption of meat and certain saturated fats can also contribute to oxidative damage but their link to Alzheimer's disease is still somewhat tentative.  

A poor diet is not the only cause of Alzheimer's disease so when people say their loved one got Alzheimer's disease and ate a healthy diet it does not disprove the role of diet--either a healthy or unhealthy diet--as a factor in Alzheimer's disease.  Genetics, environmental toxins, high levels of stress, chronic heavy smoking are among the dozens of other factors that contribute to Alzheimer's disease.  So not only does it not hurt to try various dietary recommendations, it may help.


Mac50
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 11:54 AM
Joined: 10/1/2015
Posts: 510


Thanks for your response Lane

Heathly diet is just that a healthy diet which can delay or elinimate SOME health issues.   And I am a huge advacote for healthy living but unfortunately for me it hasn't prevented one major health issue in my immediate family.   That being said maybe it has kept us around longer or delayed the onset of the illness.......there is no way to  know for sure but I will stay on my healthy diet....

 But I think where those of us that are dealing with Alz get touchy  is when it is somehow pushed as a miracle way to improve ALz or when there is an insinuation that the diet caused Alz.   My DH (55 and no family history of YOAD) until this year ate super healthy but now he is late stage 6 and I let him eat what makes him happy ... stuff he never ate like donuts and ice cream.


Crushed
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 1:14 PM
Joined: 2/2/2014
Posts: 2768


Curr Top Med Chem. 2016;16(5):529-36.

Ginseng for Alzheimer's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is no curative treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ginseng is widely used in the treatment of AD in Asian countries.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of ginseng for AD.

METHODS:

We searched seven main databases for randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on ginseng for AD from their inception to December 2014. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality. We used RevMan 5.2 to synthesize the results.

RESULTS:

Four RCTs involving 259 participants were identified for this systematic review. The methodological quality of included studies was not promising. All comparisons were made between combined treatment (ginseng plus conventional treatment) versus conventional treatment. The results of meta-analyses and several individual studies showed that the effectiveness of combined treatment was inconsistent as measured by MMSE, ADAS-cog, ADAS-noncog, and CDR. No studies reported the outcomes of quality of life (QoL). The current data did not report serious adverse events.

CONCLUSION:

This review showed that the effects of ginseng on AD were still inconclusive. The main limitations of the available studies were small sample sizes, poor methodological qualities and no placebo controls. Larger, well-designed studies are needed to test the effect of ginseng on AD in the future.


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 2:20 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4063


An unhealthy diet is one of many factors that can increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. So, it is certainly possible to have adhered to a healthy diet and still get Alzheimer's disease.  On the other hand, it may well be that the healthy diet delayed the onset of the disease by a few years at least.

As the disease progresses, there is probably less reason to maintain a strict diet (unless some other condition requires it).  There was a study several years ago that suggested that diabetics did slightly better than non-diabetics during the later stage of the disease because more glucose made it to the brain.  In any case, I used to enjoy taking my mother to the donut shop (unfortunately do to worsening esophagitis I had to regulate her diet in her final year).

I have little to disagree with regarding the meta-review of ginseng for Alzheimer's disease.  I might have used the word non-conclusive rather than inconclusive, as I have had a few people respond to me over the years claiming that the use of the word inconclusive in the review proved that ginseng was ineffective against Alzheimer's disease.  The final statement I wholeheartedly with:

Larger, well-designed studies are needed to test the effect of ginseng on AD in the future.

That is what I am attempting to do, but finding funding for even a phase one, placebo-controlled, randomized trial is difficult (and even small trials don't come cheap).

There are no miracle cures for Alzheimer's disease and I understand why caregivers and scientists bristle when they hear suggestions that such miracle cures exist.  But there is a good likelihood that effective treatments exist that improve some forms of memory at least.


Iris L.
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 7:32 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 14625


My personal belief is that even in those PWDs with the pathology of Alzheimer's Disease with plaques and tangles, there is an unknown vascular component involving hypertension, cholesterol, clotting disorders, and insulin resistance, etc.  Any improvement along these lines is a step in slowing the onslaught of progression.  I appreciate any knowledge that can possibly help me.  JMHO.  Thanks to all who post.  I gain a lot from many posts.


Iris L.


Crushed
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 7:33 PM
Joined: 2/2/2014
Posts: 2768


Lane Simonian wrote:

An unhealthy diet is one of many factors that can increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. .....

There are no miracle cures for Alzheimer's disease and I understand why caregivers and scientists bristle when they hear suggestions that such miracle cures exist.  But there is a good likelihood that effective treatments exist that improve some forms of memory at least.


I  think you are confusing and conflating two different issues.  There is no evidence at all of an effect of diet on Alzheimer's disease.  The effect, and it does exist, is on dementia but almost certainly through the process of affecting vascular dementia.  My mother died with and of vascular dementia. She had no signs whatever of Alzheimer's in life or on neuro necropsy.   Some people have one some have the other some have both.   So your comment, if applied to DEMENTIA is a reasonable evaluation of the literature.  But there is nothing to support it for Alzheimer's.

FWIW we treat my wife's Lipids ENTIRELY by diet. 

 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 9:41 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4063


I am going to approach some of this in a rather unstructured way.  Insulin resistance in the case of type 2 diabetes may be caused by nitration (driven by peroxynitrite).  More glucose then ends up in the brain which in turn increases peroxynitrite formation in the brain.

Peroxynitrite restricts the flow of blood in the brain which contributes to memory problems and perhaps delusions.  Sometimes amyloid is deposited in blood vessels which through the resulting nitro-oxidative stress further restricts blood flow in the brain.

"These findings, collectively, provide evidence that Abeta-induced peroxynitrite formation and subsequent PARP activation are critical factors, downstream of ROS [Reactive Oxygen Species], responsible for the cerebrovascular dysfunction."

So Iris's observation frequently applies.  There is often an overlap between insulin resistance, vascular dementia, high cholesterol (in cases of already existing oxidative stress), hypertension (especially caused by high levels of sodium), and Alzheimer's disease.  In regards to lowering cholesterol, diet often does work.

Certainly polyphenols can help reduce vascular dysfunction in the brain, but their effects are not limited to vascular dementia.  While epidemiological studies have their limits, those done by Scarmeas suggest that a specific diet high in polyphenols (the Mediterranean diet) both reduces the risk for Alzheimer's disease and slows down its progression.  




Lane Simonian
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 10:00 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4063


This positive and negative finding regarding polyphenols may be important.

 "More recently, high total polyphenol intake was also associated with better language and verbal memory but not with executive functioning... In addition to spatial memory, blueberry supplementation in aged animals has also been shown to improve “object recognition memory”

Object recognition, spatial memory, and verbalization were the areas in which my mother most improved.  I asked if she wanted to smell a flower and she said "that roses", she asked if a salt shaker contained sugar, she recognized her house again, and once said we were near home when we turned down our street.  She went from being almost catatonic to very verbal.  All these types of memory are connected to the hippocampus (the essential oils that she directly inhaled every day contained eugenol--a methoxyphenol--and went almost directly to the hippocampus).  Executive function (the ability to make decisions for example) and the capability to put things together in a "logical" way seemed not to change. That type of memory and skill is connected to the cortex--the other part of the brain most affected by Alzheimer's disease.  Maybe polyphenols do not reach the cortex as well. Maybe that is why improvements are seen in certain forms of memory using certain polyphenols that are sustained but not in other forms of memory.


Crushed
Posted: Monday, June 19, 2017 11:33 PM
Joined: 2/2/2014
Posts: 2768


for a recent and readable summary I suggest

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/466037

News & Perspective

Diet and Alzheimer's Disease: What the Evidence Shows

Martha Clare Morris, ScD

Disclosures

Introduction

Our understanding of dietary influences on Alzheimer's disease is in its infancy, and the number of epidemiologic studies examining promising associations is limited. Thus, at this time, we cannot say with certainty that any particular nutritional component causes or prevents Alzheimer's disease. With that caveat, much of the evidence from early studies in many ways reflects a pattern of dietary associations very similar to more established dietary risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, such as heart disease. Thus, patients who adopt these dietary practices will reduce their risk for heart disease and may also curtail their risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

 

FWIW Martha Clare Morris is teh PI of the big AD nutrition study

https://www.rush.edu/news/press-releases/study-diets-impact-dementia-alzheimers-disease-begins-january

First Study of Diet's Impact on Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease Begins in January

January 3, 2017
Volunteers sought for study funded by $14.5 million grant from the National Institute of Aging

Study tests diet on Alzheimer's
The first study of its kind designed to test the effects of a diet on the decline of cognitive abilities among a large group of individuals 65 to 84 years who currently do not have cognitive impairment will begin in January. 

“We hope to determine whether a specific diet affects or prevents the development of Alzheimer’s disease,” said Martha Clare Morris, ScD, a nutritional epidemiologist at Rush University Medical Center and principal investigator of the study funded by a $14.5 million National Institutes of Health grant. The study has two clinical sites, Rush in Chicago and Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.


JackX
Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 3:44 PM
Joined: 12/20/2016
Posts: 100


Newest from Martha Clare Morris, ScD 

http://www.theeagle.com/brazos_life/food/practical-nutrition-mind-diet-to-reduce-alzheimer-s-risk/article_062e0664-6447-50c4-850f-2f5b88db92f6.html

I thought that it is kindergarten knowledge that we should leave those specialty works to the specialists. Maybe I am too old?


 


Crushed
Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 5:31 PM
Joined: 2/2/2014
Posts: 2768


JackX wrote:

Newest from Martha Clare Morris, ScD 

http://www.theeagle.com/brazos_life/food/practical-nutrition-mind-diet-to-reduce-alzheimer-s-risk/article_062e0664-6447-50c4-850f-2f5b88db92f6.html

I thought that it is kindergarten knowledge that we should leave those specialty works to the specialists. Maybe I am too old?

never went to kindergarten. But I did teach  courses in how courts judge observational/statistical evidence. and published lots of papers on what qualifies as science, what qualifies as clinical judgement and what is junk.   People make clinical judgements all the time when the science is poor or has issues they don't want to deal with 
 The news article is about clinical judgement.  since the diet is unlikely to do any harm, only very slight evidence is required for a positive clinical judgement.  Compare it to the evidence on breast cancer.  The single most effective  way for a women to avoid breast cancer is to get pregnant by age 19.  The science is impeccable, but no one makes the suggestion as a clinical judgement. 

Bull World Health Organ. 1970;43(2):209-21.

Age at first birth and breast cancer risk.

MacMahon B, Cole P, Lin TM, Lowe CR, Mirra AP, Ravnihar B, Salber EJ, Valaoras VG, Yuasa S.

An international collaborative study of breast cancer and reproductive experience has been carried out in 7 areas of the world. In all areas studied, a striking relation between age at first birth and breast cancer risk was observed. It is estimated that women having their first child when aged under 18 years have only about one-third the breast cancer risk of those whose first birth is delayed until the age of 35 years or more

 



elainechem
Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 6:32 PM
Joined: 7/30/2013
Posts: 5262


Crushed wrote:
The single most effective  way for a women to avoid breast cancer is to get pregnant by age 19.  The science is impeccable, but no one makes the suggestion as a clinical judgement.

I guess I'm safe from breast cancer....



JackX
Posted: Tuesday, June 20, 2017 6:39 PM
Joined: 12/20/2016
Posts: 100


Crushed wrote:

...never went to kindergarten....

Me neither, just a saying learned...forgot from where. LOL.

I understand what you say, just one little fact about "RESEARCH". From computer tech, and the management technology's needs there is a programming branch called "system thinking". In research such a system just search for "key words" etc, in just nano-second?! Now such a human system became a "research experts"? I do not know what to say.

You are right, in any science, natural or social, there are always certain conventions or rules that researchers understand and follow. These rules and facts seems so foreign to those who wish to called themselves "researchers". I am have difficulties to find proper words for them. Yes, I AM TOO OLD!


 


 
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