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Sleeping...
JennT
Posted: Friday, February 9, 2018 2:18 PM
Joined: 2/9/2018
Posts: 1


My mom was diagnosed almost 5 years ago and in the last 30 days she only sleeps, it is sometimes 3:00 in the afternoon before she gets out of bed. Once up she eats a tiny bit and then heads to the chair and sleeps the rest of the afternoon, then heads to bed for a full nights sleep!  Does anyone else have experience with this??  Just wondering if it is all normal and just a sign that the Alz is progressing...
omnizero123
Posted: Friday, February 9, 2018 2:21 PM
Joined: 2/6/2018
Posts: 14


My mom recently came to stay with me and is un diagnosed, so I don't know where she falls concerning progression.  She sleeps ALOT.  Her hours are all wonky also.
mrod
Posted: Friday, February 9, 2018 2:28 PM
Joined: 10/13/2017
Posts: 2


Yes, my mom sleeps alot too. She is in about stage 6.  Sleeps at 5pm until about 3am then back to bed by 4am and up at 7 for a few hours.
abc123
Posted: Friday, February 9, 2018 3:56 PM
Joined: 6/12/2016
Posts: 237


My Mom sleeps a lot. She has always stayed up late and slept late in the morning. She has always had problems with depression. She is probably stage 5/6 and she would sleep constantly if my Dad let her. She will wake up about midnight and be very alert and hungry. After she has a snack she goes right back to bed.

 


mrod
Posted: Friday, February 9, 2018 4:11 PM
Joined: 10/13/2017
Posts: 2


Has your mom had strange eating habits?   This morning I found a thawed out frozen pizza on the table, it had a piece missing as if she ate some of it.    One time she got a cup of coffee and put mustard instead of cream.   We brought it to her attention and she said it was ok..?  Sometimes she likes to put up the dishes and we find bowls in the fridge. We'll find plates where the glasses go. Sometimes she washes clothes that are already clean. She is always hiding things then forgets where she puts them. Her curlers, comb, toothbrush.   I would search all her drawers and closet and not find anything.  But one time we did find some lipstick hidden at the bottom of a silk plant.
Loving him
Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 2:06 AM
Joined: 2/10/2018
Posts: 2


My husband has Alzheimer's. He also sleeps most of the time except to get up to eat so I know what you're experiencing. When he does wake up he cries a lot and says "help me, help me" and "oh me" or just makes a crying noise. He either is in pain or anxious or thinks he needs to go take care of something. It is heart breaking to listen to. I usually soothe him until he calms down and he always goes back to sleep. I always wonder if I should force him to be more active but I have been in bad health and can't really get out much. It's really difficult.
Marty Cares 79
Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 7:04 AM
Joined: 11/1/2017
Posts: 97


My DH will sleep 22 out of 24 hrs.If and when he gets up, could be 4 or 5 in afternoon ,he eats a small breakfast which is always soft boiled egg on toast(only thing I can get him to eat) and 2 Ensure, then falls asleep in his chair

He has lost sooooo much weight.Has no appetite.He is doing ok in other areas, just does nothing but sleep.He says he is so tired.Age 85


MN Chickadee
Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 8:37 AM
Joined: 9/7/2014
Posts: 538


Is she on medication or has there been a change in them recently? Drug interactions could cause it.  I know Namenda caused my mom to be very sleepy.

I would tell her doctor of this new development, just to be safe. 


His Daughter
Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 10:31 AM
Joined: 6/25/2014
Posts: 2230


Jenn, unless there is a medication issue as MN Chickadee has mentioned, this is the progression of the disease and very normal.  

An aggressive need for sleep is common with strokes, traumatic brain injury, and Alzheimer's.  The brain is working so hard to make connections that is unable to make.  Sleep allows time for the brain to reorganize and regroup to the best of it's ability.  

As my father declined, it got harder and harder to get him out of bed some days.  We also hit a pattern where it was one day up, and then he'd be in bed all the next day.  It also seemed that if we had a "good" day with plenty of activity and awake hours, we could count on the fact that this next day would be just the opposite.  We simply rolled with whatever the day had to offer.  We didn't push it.  I know may people want to keep the person engaged in their surroundings, as though they are doing something wrong, or being a bad caregiver, if they don't.  But over stimulation is not helpful.   So take a deep breath, you aren't doing anything wrong.  This is the disease process screaming.  

Eventually, in the final stage, they are completely bed bound and sleep most of the time.  And I'm talking like 23 out of 24 hours per day. 

 


VKB
Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 2:26 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 3345


Jean, you may want to have her checked by a doctor before deciding it is just the progression of her dementia/Alzheimer's.  Sometimes those with this illness can't tell us what is bothering them.  Peace always Veronica
 
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