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TROUBLE WAKING SPOUSE WITH ALZHEIMERS
Larry70
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 11:49 AM
Joined: 11/1/2016
Posts: 4


SINCE TIME CHANGE AND FALL I AM HAVING PROBLEMS GETTING MY WIFE OUT OF BED. I USUALLY START AROUND 8:30AM AND IT TAKES 1.5HRS OR MORE TO FINALLY GET HER UP.

WHAT HAS WORKED FOR OTHER SPOUSES IN GETTING SPOUSE UP?  SHE HAS MEDS THAT ARE TO BE TAKEN EVERY 12 HRS FOR HEART/CIRCULATION.

THANKS


Mimi S.
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 12:07 PM
Joined: 11/29/2011
Posts: 6643


Hi Larry,

Welcome to our world. I'm so glad you foud our site.

A Hoyer lift can be used to lift your wife from a reclining position.  And something like a 'lift me up' can be used to move a LO from one sitting position to another.

I had a relative whose Alzheimer's caused him to forget how to move his legs to walk. The above two devices were available in his Assisted Living Residence.

 

Do you have a problem getting your LO to take the every 12 hours meds?  Wonder if we take the same one? I have a reminder on my phone.

 

Do free free to call our help line and chat: 1-800-272-3900
Larry70
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 1:07 PM
Joined: 11/1/2016
Posts: 4


PROBLEM IS WAKING HER UP AND GETTING HER TO GET OUT OF BED. SHE WANTS TO LAY THERE AND SLEEP. 2-3 MONTHS AGO SHE WAS WAKING UP  ON HER OWN MOST OF THE TIME.
markus8174
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 8:29 PM
Joined: 1/25/2018
Posts: 215


I'm not sure you are solving the right problem. I cherish the time my DW is asleep. It is restful not to have to field the endless, repetitive, nonsensical  ramblings of the disease that has taken over my DW. I would suggest you discuss options with her prescribing physician. Many meds that are every 6, 8, or12 hours also come in a sustained release form that allows it to be taken once a day. In addition, there are a number of transdermal(patch) options depending on what medications she requires. The slow release forms and transdermal patches are almost always a bit more expensive than the immediate release meds, but for your piece of mind, and your spouses, it may be worth it. My DW has started sleeping 15-18 hours a day. Her ability to nap has greatly increased my ability to be patient and loving. As I posted in another thread, my DW is at her best 10 minutes after waking, and starts going down hill a couple of hours later. You may find if you can allow her to find her own equilibrium, she may be happier and more cooperative with her care. One more thing. Excessive sleepiness can be a sign of depression. Our AD family members certainly have every reason to be depressed, but it may be worth exploring if she would do better on an antidepressant. I found a switch to Trintellix improved both my DW's mood, and mental clarity for many months before this monster disease claimed more of her mind.
NC caregiver
Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:20 AM
Joined: 2/7/2018
Posts: 660


I stay home with Mom & let her wake whenever she wants .  She usually wakes up really early , goes to bathroom & goes back to bed.   She usually gets up around 830 or 900, but she occasionally will sleep til 10 or 11 . I just give her meds when she wakes, but she is just on Donepezile & B12 in the AM .   She does sleep more when she had a UTI so if she feels tired all day you may want to check with the Dr about possible UTI or other infection.  Mom is stage 6 & averages about 12 hours a night in bed.  She takes Trazadone to help with sleep.    Before Trazadone she would be awake most of the night & then sleep all morning .   I know in later stages they sleep more. 

 

I do enjoy having some "me" time in the morning while she's sleeping.   I get up around 6 to shower, pay bills, read, etc . 


Rescue mom
Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2018 2:13 PM
Joined: 10/12/2018
Posts: 81


My DH with AD also sleeps much later than he used to. It does not seem like a problem, though. There’s no reason or rule that he has to be up at a certain time. He also has meds every 12 hours, but that doesn’t mean they have to be given at a specified time of day.
Peter5
Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2018 4:42 PM
Joined: 5/30/2013
Posts: 1030


As the disease progresses, they sleep more.  It took me a long time to figure out that there was no need to "impose" a rigid schedule that was really no longer applicable.  They are doing what their body needs.  You will both be happier once you realize this.
jfkoc
Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:08 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 15794


Maybe crush the med in a spoonful of applesauce ...give it to her ande let her go back to sleep?
Ed1937
Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:25 PM
Joined: 4/2/2018
Posts: 548


jfkoc wrote:
Maybe crush the med in a spoonful of applesauce ...give it to her ande let her go back to sleep?

Just make sure it is OK to crush the pills.

 



jfkoc
Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2018 8:08 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 15794


yes, check with pharmacist
 
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