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This d9esnt seem real.
Sparks71
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 11:50 AM
Joined: 11/26/2019
Posts: 4


I just keep thinking this diagnosis has to be wrong. I've noticed something was wrong, missing words, forgetting most everything after a minute. Then I go through my day and think it went well. I worked and made it home. I dont think people are noticing at work. I've missed some important things but because what I've missed is between different departments no one has put it together. I told my husband and 8 cant explain it to hi . Maybe there 8s some info you can suggest? He thinks its just me being me. I've been forgetful for years.. Haha jokes on him, I've probably had this for years. 

How come sometimes I have a mostly normal c8nversation and sometimes I cant finish a sentence? And this typo stuff is driving me crazy!! Never have I had such a problem with spelling. 

Anyway, I'm new, I'm only 48 and I'm going for a second opinio . 

Please tell me what your first signs were that something wasnt right. Am I really early alzheimers or just getting goofy? 


Amelillo99
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 12:54 PM
Joined: 10/7/2019
Posts: 21


Did you already get the diagnosis from the doctor?

Sparks71
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 3:06 PM
Joined: 11/26/2019
Posts: 4


Yes, on thursday. I keep retesting myself online lol.
Iris L.
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 3:11 PM
Joined: 12/15/2011
Posts: 16191


Welcome Sparks.  Missing words and forgetting are very common occurrences, especially in middle age.  This is rarely due to younger onset Alzheimer's disease.  But it can be due to a myriad of common medical conditions, medication side effects, or unusual stress or mental overload.  It is very important to get a thorough medical evaluation from a good primary care physician who will examine you, do blood and other tests, and do a mini screening test for memory loss.  Have you gone through all of that already?  


  Be sure to discuss your sleep, because this is often overlooked.  Be sure to get an overnight sleep study in a hospital sleep lab  looking for sleep apnea.


 

If you have been thoroughly tested, you must consult with a dementia specialist neurologist.  There are many dementia mimics.  The diagnosis of the dementias is made after all dementia mimics have been ruled out and there is demonstrated progression.  Has this been done?

 

Please keep us updated on what is happening with you, Sparks.


Iris L.


Amelillo99
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 3:52 PM
Joined: 10/7/2019
Posts: 21


Do you have a family history of Alzheimer’s ?
jfkoc
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 5:38 PM
Joined: 12/4/2011
Posts: 17547


If you select ALZ.org at the top of this page you will begin to  understand the correct protocol for diagnosis. There are more online.
Sparks71
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 6:02 PM
Joined: 11/26/2019
Posts: 4


Yes, both grandparents on my moms side and grandma on my dads side. Early onset for grandma on moms side.
Sparks71
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 6:08 PM
Joined: 11/26/2019
Posts: 4


There is much more than losing words. Not knowing what I'm doing in the middle of doing things. Driving past my house or work and so much more. I am going to see a neurologist and have had full work up from primary.
BadMoonRising
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 10:54 PM
Joined: 4/22/2017
Posts: 283


Let me get this out of the way first. I am NOT stating that I believe you have AD. I have no idea. You asked about our first signs that "something wasn't right". Soooo.

What you have described sounds eerily similar to what I experienced (and still do), except you're a heckuva lot younger than I was when I first noticed symptoms. I also have a history of ADHD, which, of course, causes forgetfulness and carelessness, etc.

 But I knew that my symptoms were different this time, so I met with a psychologist, told him I was losing my mind, and he immediately referred for neuropsych testing.  I won't bore you with the details except to say that two neuropsych evaluations administered six years apart resulted in diagnoses of Mild Cognitive Impairment and AD, respectively. I was shocked with the AD diagnosis. After the AD diagnosis, I underwent an Amyloid PET to rule out AD. Unfortunately, that didn't happen...I had a positive scan.

Yep, my world was shattered. My emotions eventually settled down and the "Oops" moments were embarassing but I learned to live with them. Until now, that is. Here we go again. Ugh! I'll be visiting my neurologist very soon.

I hope you're getting goofy but we're here just in case, o.k.?


Amelillo99
Posted: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 2:59 AM
Joined: 10/7/2019
Posts: 21


Does no one of your parents have had Alzheimer’s ?
Towanda the Avenger
Posted: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 6:55 PM
Joined: 11/27/2019
Posts: 1


I understand....I was diagnosed with early onset in September, and I still feel like this doesn't feel real.  The only testing I had was an MRI, and a 4 hour cognitive testing for memory that I apparently didn't do well on.

I knew there was something wrong with me...I work with math, and I got to the point that I couldn't do basic math.

I hope that your second opinion gives you a good result.

 


looking4relief
Posted: Tuesday, December 3, 2019 12:19 AM
Joined: 11/27/2019
Posts: 18


Hi, I think the biggest part about this kind of illness is grieving. It takes a lot of grieving since it has no cure. I get embarrassed at work by things I forget and my confusion. Most of the times others make excuses for my memory losses or find it amusing. Something degenerative or serious would never cross their minds as I'm younger than you. Then I have lots of 'firsts'. Like the first time my memory tricks me into thinking I ate something I didn't,  then being lost in time. Within days and weeks. It's distressing. I don't think it's something anyone would imagine that would happen to them. Making it your new reality and making people realize it's your new reality is a big part of the work.

On a more positive note for people with Alzheimer I find my grand mother much more accessible since she has Alz. She is authentic. She used to always hide what she truly thought. Now when she says something I feel like she mostly means it. Also she is no longer racist. For a person with Alz she is very joyful. She still has a sense of humour and can laugh on something she would have found funny before, altough she will forget everything 15 seconds later. She sings often with other Alz living at her residence and they know the same songs. She tells me when I'm leaving how grateful she is of my visits and how much she enjoys them, welcomes me to come back anytime (altought it may just be an old habit), even now that she is very lost. I have enjoyed a lot of moments with her since her diagnosis.


 
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