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Large study links gum disease with dementia
DJnAZ
Posted: Saturday, July 24, 2021 7:07 PM
Joined: 7/6/2021
Posts: 28


Has anyone seen this information? I searched this forum and couldn't find any related information or link.

Large Study Links Gum Disease with Dementia

The mouth is home to about 700 species of bacteria, including those that can cause periodontal (gum) disease. A recent analysis led by NIA scientists suggests that bacteria that cause gum disease are also associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, especially vascular dementia. The results were reported in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

The link can be found at:

https://www.nia.nih.gov/news/large-study-links-gum-disease-dementia

 


Lane Simonian
Posted: Saturday, July 24, 2021 7:57 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4973


Gum disease/oral bacteria is one of dozens of factors that can lead to Alzheimer's disease. Others including chronic viral and fungal infections (and other bacterial infections), a diet high in salt, sugar, and other carbohydrates, exposure to heavy metals, air pollutants, pesticides, herbicides, and other environmental toxins, and psychological stress.  This is one of the best ways to look at the causal nature of Alzheimer's disease.

"Dr Carrasco and his team think a clinical trial of anti-fungal drugs is the next logical step. But there is yet another possibility. In the absence of a definitive ultimate cause, it may be that the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease can arise from many different types of insult to the brain. There have been several papers, says Dr Le Guillou, that have found correlations between various infectious organisms and Alzheimer’s. “It could be a bit like the Mississippi river,” says Dr Hardy. “You can start in all sorts of places, but eventually you’re going to end up in New Orleans.” If Alzheimer’s is a general response to all sorts of neurological triggers then it may be that the fungal infections found by Dr Carrasco are simply one of a long list of causes."


Victoria2020
Posted: Saturday, July 24, 2021 8:29 PM
Joined: 9/21/2017
Posts: 971



“You can start in all sorts of places, but eventually you’re going to end up in New Orleans.”

Sounds like a good Noir style novel. We are in a gumbo mess for sure.



Jimbob59
Posted: Saturday, July 24, 2021 9:02 PM
Joined: 5/4/2017
Posts: 91


My mothers mother had "hardening of the arteries" aka dementia, granny had 11 children, out of her 11 children the only ones who have not had Alzheimer's died young. One of my cousins has already died from dementia at 72 years of age and two more   cousins in there 60's a brother and sister have been diagnosed maybe more but not aware of the others health. I suspect heredity has a lot to say about who gets it.
Lane Simonian
Posted: Saturday, July 24, 2021 9:06 PM
Joined: 12/12/2011
Posts: 4973


Heredity certainly has something to do with it.  Certain genes almost guarantee the onset of Alzheimer's disease and others increase the risk.  It is the non-genetic risk factors that help determine the age of onset.
Crushed
Posted: Sunday, July 25, 2021 6:49 AM
Joined: 2/2/2014
Posts: 6691


Lane Simonian wrote:

Gum disease/oral bacteria is one of dozens of factors that can lead to Alzheimer's disease.



We don't know any of this.   "lead to" is not a medical term.

 Rammazini of Padua studied nuns and breast cancer in 1713.  His data is excellent .  Nuns have a higher rate of breast cancer BUT WHY?  

His best theory was the lack of sex.   He was correct  It is still known today 
LACK OF SEX LEADS TO BREAST CANCER

However the  CAUSE was  not lack of sex but lack of early pregnancy. Early pregnancies are protective against breast cancer.  Sex without pregnancy has no protective effect.

So please stick to science not journalism 
    
 

 


David J
Posted: Sunday, July 25, 2021 8:08 AM
Joined: 2/15/2020
Posts: 391


My immediate thought was that it was the other way around!  One of my concerns for DW is her oral health. Getting DW to brush her teeth and to do a good job of it has gotten very difficult. She hasn’t seen a dentist in several years, and I can’t see her being able to sit through a dental exam or follow instructions.
Rennbird
Posted: Monday, July 26, 2021 3:54 PM
Joined: 2/23/2017
Posts: 71


Crushed, Very interesting.  How early is an early pregnancy.  My mom was 22 when she had her first pregnancy and she had three more children after that.  If a women is 16 and has an abortion, where lwould this fit into the equation?
Crushed
Posted: Tuesday, July 27, 2021 7:27 AM
Joined: 2/2/2014
Posts: 6691


Rennbird wrote:
Crushed, Very interesting.  How early is an early pregnancy.  My mom was 22 when she had her first pregnancy and she had three more children after that.  If a women is 16 and has an abortion, where lwould this fit into the equation?

Pregnancy and breast cancer risk

Women who have a full-term pregnancy before age 20 have a lower risk of breast cancer than women who never have a full-term pregnancy or who have their first full-term pregnancy after the age of 30 or 35. The risk of breast cancer also goes down as the number of full-term pregnancies goes up. Still, a full-term pregnancy after age 30 is linked to a higher risk of breast cancer than never giving birth.

The reasons for these changes in risk are not entirely clear. We do know that hormone levels typically change a lot during pregnancy. Some of these changes cause cells in the breast to mature, to help prepare to produce milk for breastfeeding. This might affect the tendency for these cells to become cancerous. Pregnancy also decreases a woman’s total number of menstrual cycles, which also seems to affect breast cancer risk. Still, the reason for the differences in breast cancer risk based on the woman’s age during her first full-term pregnancy is not known.

https://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/medical-treatments/abortion-and-breast-cancer-risk.html

 


 
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